eGun

Willkommen, Gast ( Anmelden | Registrierung )

Zurück zum Board Index
5 Seiten V   1 2 3 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Ground Combat Vehicle, folgt FCS folgt Bradley
Panzermann
Beitrag 13. Mar 2010, 18:29 | Beitrag #1
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberstleutnant
Beiträge: 11.635



Gruppe: VIP
Mitglied seit: 19.11.2002


ZITAT
Army’s GCV Not Just MGV Warmed Over

I wrote up an interview I did last week with Col. Bryan McVeigh, program manager for the Army’s new Ground Combat Vehicle program on companion site DOD Buzz and wanted to post it here for DT readers.

I asked McVeigh why the Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) request for proposal was held up by the Pentagon’s chief weapons buyer Ashton Carter. Carter and his senior staff wanted to make sure that the Army was truly opening up competition for the GCV and that was made clear in the RFP, said McVeigh.

The GCV acquisition program “is focused on competition,” with up to three contractors selected for the technology development phase. The Army hasn’t kept two builders going head-to-head through early development since the Abrams main battle tank program, McVeigh said.

The Army wants companies other than armored vehicle builders BAE and General Dynamics to pitch proposals. “We want to be able to look at other American companies to allow them to break into this niche market. This isn’t just MGV warmed over. I just don’t want one or two companies that were deep in MGV have a competitive advantage in this,” he said.


OSD did not make any major changes to the Army’s plans, McVeigh said. Industry proposals are due in late April, then the source selection process begins, culminating in September with a “Milestone A” decision from Carter’s office, allowing the Army to award the actual production contract.

The Army is trying to build on six years of development work on the FCS Manned Ground Vehicle, and months ago it gave industry that development “body of knowledge,” which laid out the preliminary design, to incorporate into their proposals for the GCV.

Where the Army’s plans for GCV differ most significantly from the ill-starred FCS program is they don’t want “revolutionary” technologies this time around. FCS was all about pushing the technological envelope in everything from high-tech armors to automotive components to sensors, which resulted in a lot of time and money spent with very little to show for it. Its all about program “risk” avoidance this time around, all GCV technologies must be at technology readiness level 6, which means they’ve proven to work in a simulated operational environment.

“Our goal is to make sure we get something out to the soldiers within seven years… if we wait for the perfect solution we’re never going to get it into the hands of soldiers,” McVeigh said. We need their feedback to continue and improve the design.

The biggest changes over the original FCS vehicle design is in the armor package and other “survivability” fixes. The GCV will be significantly heavier than the FCS MGV, which started out at 20 tons and ultimately grew to around 34 tons before it was cancelled. McVeigh wouldn’t specify the vehicle’s weight exactly, because he wants to give industry bit of latitude. This is the first vehicle, at least since the Abrams tank, that from the beginning is built to be readily upgradeable, McVeigh said, which means the ability to add more armor.

It will come with a base level, “Level 0,” armor protection for irregular fights of the kind found in Iraq where the big threat is IEDs, explosively formed penetrators and mostly small-arms up to heavy machine guns. While the MRAP is a great vehicle for specific battlefields, he said, it doesn’t have needed cross-country mobility. “Based off the lessons we’ve learned in theater, survivability doesn’t just come from armor, it doesn’t just come from active-protection systems, it comes from not allowing the enemy to channel you into one area.”

The GCV must have mobility equivalent to an Abrams tank. Although McVeigh refused to say so, cross-country mobility, especially on any kind of soft ground or snow, only comes from tracks. In urban areas, tracked vehicles have the advantage of being able to pivot steer, which is a huge advantage over wheeled vehicles.

The “Level 1” armor package, will add appliqué armor that also protects up to auto-cannon, along the lines of the current Bradley. An active-protection (APS) system will be included on the vehicle to provide 360 degree protection against RPGs, which is the threshold requirement; the objective requirements, are an APS that can defeat heavier anti-tank guided missiles and sabot rounds. But McVeigh says builders must demonstrate how they’ll improve on the existing APS architecture the ability to defeat those heavier threats down the road as technology improves. “I don’t want two different computers running it. I don’t want two different radar systems running it.”

The Army is developing an improved version of Raytheon’s Quick Kill APS system. The Army is continuing to develop its APS, contractors can bid any system they want, McVeigh said, as long as they meet the GCV holistic requirements.

The FCS vehicles were designed to fit inside a C-130. That is not the case with the GCV. Transportability requirements are that it must be C-17 and C-5 transportable. “It allows us the weight flexibility,” he said. Trying to keep the FCS vehicles inside that C-130 box forced designers to dump too much armor protection and other important components.

The GCV must carry a 12 man team, a 9 man rifle squad and a three man crew. Cooling the interior of the GCV will be a big challenge, because the vehicle will carry many more computers and video panels than any other vehicles. Built into the design will be a 30 percent margin for growth in cooling and at least a 20 percent growth in propulsion.

I asked McVeigh how the GCV would match up against the current Bradley, which it is intended to replace:

“It will have significantly better mine and IED protection, it will have greater lethality, it will have a bigger cannon. It will allow us to carry more men… a complete squad. It will have about the same mobility of the Bradley but the ability to carry significantly enhanced communications and electronics so I don’t have to divert power from the propulsion system for cooling. It will have significantly improved reliability than the Bradley. It will have integrated non-lethal capabilities, which none of our vehicles have today.”

– Greg
Quelle: http://defensetech.org/2010/03/09/armys-gc...gv-warmed-over/




ZITAT
Army solicits proposals for new combat vehicle
Mar 2, 2010
By C. Todd Lopez


WASHINGTON (Army News Service, March 2, 2010) -- The Army released a request for proposal for the Ground Combat Vehicle Feb. 25 -- marking an official start for defense contractors to begin competing for the right to build the service's next combat vehicle.

Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Peter W. Chiarelli said the new vehicle will not be simply a rehash of the cancelled Future Combat Systems, but a relevant combat vehicle based on Army experiences in combat.

"This is a vehicle here that takes into account the lessons of eight years of war. It is not just FCS warmed over," said Chiarelli, during a video teleconference, Feb. 25, with attendees at the Association of the United States Army's Institute of Land Warfare Winter Symposium and Exposition in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

The general said key performance parameters for the vehicle include, among other things, full-spectrum capability, net-readiness, and mobility. It should have the operational mobility of the Stryker and underbelly protection of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle, or MRAP, according to the Brigade Combat Team Modernization Plan released Feb. 19.

Chiarelli said the Army is hoping for "three solid proposals" on the RFP -- those proposals must be in by April 26. The Army will then award technology development contracts to bidders in September -- marking milestone A in the GCV development process. Contract awardees will then enter the technology development phase that runs through December 2012.

Ultimately, Chiarelli said, the Army expects to award a low-rate initial production contract for the GCV by March 2016, and achieve initial operational capability in the second quarter of 2019.

Chiarelli said adaptability to the operational environment is key for the GCV.

"It will allow commanders to make a determination on what level of protection they need on that vehicle based on the enemy situation they find themselves in," he said.

Chiarelli also discussed the nature of America's enemies in Iraq and Afghanistan, countering claims they are less than capable adversaries.

"They are truly formidable adversaries," Chiarelli said. "But because they are not state-sponsored, many dismiss them as not being worthy opponents. There are those, and I'd argue too many, who somehow think because they are terrorists, they are not as capable opponents as we have fought in past conflicts."

The general also pointed out the enemy's adeptness at passing information to its lowest foot soldiers.

"The enemy is very, very good," Chiarelli said. "In fact, he has done a much better job, in some instances, in pushing information down to the tactical edge -- his tactical edge. He doesn't have the same security requirements that we do, in doing that. But he has been more than willing to push that information down, using technology."

The enemy's lack of information security, however, is a weakness that can be exploited by the Army, Chiarelli said.

"The fact that he lacks some of that security has in many ways allowed us to track him down," he said. "We end up catching or killing many of his fighters as a result. But he is willing to accept those losses."

The general also said the way the Army has operated has changed, as Soldiers at the farthest reaches of the battlefield are today providing as much information upstream to commanders as commanders are pushing information downstream. The change has resulted in a need to move decision-making responsibility closer to the Soldier.

"I believed you had a period (in the past) when decision making basically flowed from the top on down," he said. "Orders were given to the different levels of the chain of command. Today, we see as much information being passed up, from the edge, as we see being passed down from above. Whereas before we had decision making, very strict decision making, today, we have commanders who provide intent to Soldiers that are down on the edge."

Facilitating the faster, more secure flow of information is something Chiarelli said the Army is working on by developing its information network, including the "Everything over Internet Protocol" concept.

Quelle: http://www.army.mil/-news/2010/03/02/35174...combat-vehicle/

Der Beitrag wurde von Praetorian bearbeitet: 13. Mar 2010, 23:28
Bearbeitungsgrund: Ausgelagert


--------------------
ZITAT(Hawkeye @ 28. Mar 2011, 04:37) *
Tipp des Tages:
.454 Casull Flachkopf-Massivgeschosse eignen sich hervorragend als Ohrenstöpsel!
 
MeckieMesser
Beitrag 13. Mar 2010, 19:49 | Beitrag #2
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Leutnant
Beiträge: 565



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 10.03.2007


Es scheint als hätte man die ehrgeizigen Pläne für den Lufttransport endlich verworfen. Die Gewichtsfrage lässt die US Army völlig offen.
Sind solche Ausschreibungen nur national in den USA?
 
Warhammer
Beitrag 13. Mar 2010, 23:25 | Beitrag #3
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 3.901



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 15.10.2002


Mal abgesehen von der Absitzstärke liest sich das ganze fast wie die Beschreibung vom Puma. Schön das auch die Amis langsam wieder in die Realität zurückfinden.

Nur die Absitzstärke kommt mir etwas hoch vor. 9 Mann passen z.B. auch in den Namer, aber der ist selbst ohne MK-Turm ein riesiges Biest.


--------------------
(\__/)
(O.o )
(> < ) This is Bunny. Copy Bunny into your signature to help him on his way to world domination!
 
Panzermann
Beitrag 14. Mar 2010, 20:29 | Beitrag #4
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberstleutnant
Beiträge: 11.635



Gruppe: VIP
Mitglied seit: 19.11.2002


ZITAT(MeckieMesser @ 13. Mar 2010, 19:49) *
Es scheint als hätte man die ehrgeizigen Pläne für den Lufttransport endlich verworfen. Die Gewichtsfrage lässt die US Army völlig offen.


Haben in den letzten Jahren (Jahrzehnten) auch viel Geld in den Sand gesetzt um ein bestimmtes Gewicht zu halten und dann sind die Fahrzeuge doch wieder schwerer geworden.
ZITAT
Sind solche Ausschreibungen nur national in den USA?

Bevorzugt wird zu Hause eingekauft. Macht doch jedes größere Land so. für den Puma/Igel/Panther gab es ja auch keine Ausschreibung mit zb Warrior, CV90 und Ulan als Teilnehmer.


--------------------
ZITAT(Hawkeye @ 28. Mar 2011, 04:37) *
Tipp des Tages:
.454 Casull Flachkopf-Massivgeschosse eignen sich hervorragend als Ohrenstöpsel!
 
Praetorian
Beitrag 14. Mar 2010, 20:41 | Beitrag #5
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Konteradmiral
Beiträge: 17.145



Gruppe: Globalmod.WHQ
Mitglied seit: 06.08.2002


ZITAT(Panzermann @ 14. Mar 2010, 20:29) *
für den Puma/Igel/Panther gab es ja auch keine Ausschreibung mit zb Warrior, CV90 und Ulan als Teilnehmer.

Keine Ausschreibung. Aber zumindest CV90 wurde bis zuletzt als Alternative untersucht, in früheren Phasen auch andere Fahrzeuge.


--------------------
This just in: Beverly Hills 90210 - Cleveland Browns 3
 
Praetorian
Beitrag 21. May 2010, 20:48 | Beitrag #6
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Konteradmiral
Beiträge: 17.145



Gruppe: Globalmod.WHQ
Mitglied seit: 06.08.2002


Stv. Generalstabschef der Army nimmt zur geäußerten Kritik am Hüftspeck des GCV Stellung.
45 bis 65 metrische Tonnen sind ja aber auch kein Pappenstiel, trotz modularer Konzeption.


--------------------
This just in: Beverly Hills 90210 - Cleveland Browns 3
 
lastdingo
Beitrag 21. May 2010, 23:58 | Beitrag #7
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Major
Beiträge: 6.191



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 04.12.2001


Afghanistan hat seitens der Briten mal wieder gezeigt, dass Infanteriegruppen nur dann ihrem Namen Ehre machen können, wenn sie genug Köpfe haben. 6-7 ist einfach zu wenig. Insofern ist der Ansatz "9" erst mal gesund, zumal aus ganz alltäglichen Gründen (Verletzung etc) eh durchschnittlich 1-2 Mann fehlen selbst wenn man es mit einem ziemlich harmlosen Gegner zu tun hat. Bei ernsthaften Gegnern wird vermutlich ein Sitzplatz oftmals mit Gerät zugemüllt sein.

Die Zielvorstellung "9 Mann absitzstärke" ist insofern ganz gut. Das entspricht auch zwei ihrer fire teams + squad leader.


--------------------
 
Warhammer
Beitrag 22. May 2010, 00:49 | Beitrag #8
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 3.901



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 15.10.2002


Wenn man kein Problem damit hat ein Fahrzeug zu nutzen was, dank Turm, vielleicht größer wird als ein Namer ist das auch ok.

Die Frage ist, ob man solch einen Brocken nutzen will.
Interessant ist bei den Amis halt besonders diese extreme Wende um 180 Grad.


--------------------
(\__/)
(O.o )
(> < ) This is Bunny. Copy Bunny into your signature to help him on his way to world domination!
 
lastdingo
Beitrag 22. May 2010, 01:06 | Beitrag #9
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Major
Beiträge: 6.191



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 04.12.2001


Sie haben halt genug Programme und genug Inventar für Nicht-Gefechtsfahrzeuge.

Gefechtsfahrzeuge brauchen aber nun mal guten Schutz (zumindest für offensiven Einsatz), und die merken wohl, dass sie nicht mehrere Programme hinbekommen. Große Gefechtsfahrzeugprogramme haben sie ja schon seit Jahrzehnten regelmäßig in den Sand gesetzt oder mit großem Krach durchgekriegt.
Also entweder setzen sie das Chassis in eine Gewichtsklasse, bei der man auch den Abrams ersetzen kann, oder sie juckeln auch noch in 2030 mit dem doch recht suboptimalen Abrams rum.

Mehr als 55 t ist allerdings schon ein etwas erstaunlicher Kompromiss.


--------------------
 
Warhammer
Beitrag 22. May 2010, 15:16 | Beitrag #10
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 3.901



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 15.10.2002


Wo kommt denn jetzt schon wieder die Idee her, dass der M1 suboptimal ist?

Klar ist guter Schutz wichtig, aber man sollte sich auch überlegen, dass ein so großes Monster als SPz auch seine Nachteile hat. Mit Grennis will ich ja schließlich auch mal Ortschaften und das eine oder andere Wäldchen freikämpfen. Je größer da der SPz desto öfter muss man auf dessen direkte Unterstützung verzichten.

Da halte ich die Schutzklasse eines Puma (in Zukunft unterstützt durch soft- und hardkill Systeme) eigentlich ausreichend.


--------------------
(\__/)
(O.o )
(> < ) This is Bunny. Copy Bunny into your signature to help him on his way to world domination!
 
lastdingo
Beitrag 22. May 2010, 15:55 | Beitrag #11
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Major
Beiträge: 6.191



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 04.12.2001


ZITAT(Warhammer @ 22. May 2010, 16:16) *
Wo kommt denn jetzt schon wieder die Idee her, dass der M1 suboptimal ist?


Vom übertriebenen Spritverbrauch, der Notwendigkeit ihn wesentlich upzugraden für den Einsatz gegen erbärmlichst ausgerüstete Gegner oder der Tatsache, dass das Design so alt ist wie ich?


--------------------
 
MeckieMesser
Beitrag 22. May 2010, 16:18 | Beitrag #12
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Leutnant
Beiträge: 565



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 10.03.2007


Wenn man die M113 ersetzen will, dann ist das eine menge Gewicht. Am Ende werden sie das Ding entweder reduzieren oder das Programm splitten.
Ansonsten können sie auch gleich noch jede Menge Tankfahrzeuge und Bridge Layer mitbestellen.
 
harmlos
Beitrag 22. May 2010, 16:25 | Beitrag #13
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberst
Beiträge: 3.910



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 23.07.2001


ZITAT(Warhammer @ 22. May 2010, 16:16) *
Wo kommt denn jetzt schon wieder die Idee her, dass der M1 suboptimal ist?

Klar ist guter Schutz wichtig, aber man sollte sich auch überlegen, dass ein so großes Monster als SPz auch seine Nachteile hat. Mit Grennis will ich ja schließlich auch mal Ortschaften und das eine oder andere Wäldchen freikämpfen. Je größer da der SPz desto öfter muss man auf dessen direkte Unterstützung verzichten.

Da halte ich die Schutzklasse eines Puma (in Zukunft unterstützt durch soft- und hardkill Systeme) eigentlich ausreichend.


Ein Puma in Schutzstufe C mit Platz für 3 zusätzliche Infantristen und einem anständigen Turm würde genau gleichviel wiegen - die Kombination aus Absitzstärke, Schutz und Waffe ist leichter einfach nicht umsetzbar. Wieso sollte eine Ortschaft oder ein Wäldchen einen 60t SPz aufhalten?


--------------------
Die ZDV liegt - gottseidank - in irgendeinem Panzerschrank.
Bei irgendeinem fremden Mann, der sie bestimmt nicht brauchen kann.
 
Warhammer
Beitrag 22. May 2010, 18:57 | Beitrag #14
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 3.901



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 15.10.2002


@last Dingo
Welcher Panzer außer vielleicht einem Merk Mrk.IV ist den nicht ohne zusätzliche Ausstattung für ein Szenario wie Irak schlecht ausgestattet?
Sprit ist ein Problem, aber bei den logistischen Kapazitäten der Amis vielleicht ein kleineres als man es manchmal aufblasen will. Ansonsten kann man in Sachen Beweglichkeit, Feuerkraft, Schutz (auch nach einem Durchschlag) und Führungssystemen nicht wirklich meckern.

Natürlich ist der in 30 Jahren nicht mehr aktuell, aber ein paar Jahre hält er noch.
Ansonsten halte ich einen Ersatz des Bradleys für wesentlich wichtiger als einen neuen KPz. Man sollte da nicht zu viel auf die Möglichkeit eines gemeinsamen Chassis bauen.

@Harmlos
Natürlich wäre ein Puma mit mehr Absitzstärke genauso groß, aber das meine ich nicht. Ich meine das ein SPz wie der Puma gegenüber einem noch größeren SPz auch Vorteile hat.
Dabei kann man beim manövrieren in den Straßen einer Stadt oder in bewaldetem Gebiet bei großen Ausmaßen schon von einem Nachteil sprechen.


--------------------
(\__/)
(O.o )
(> < ) This is Bunny. Copy Bunny into your signature to help him on his way to world domination!
 
lastdingo
Beitrag 22. May 2010, 21:04 | Beitrag #15
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Major
Beiträge: 6.191



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 04.12.2001


ZITAT(Warhammer @ 22. May 2010, 19:57) *
@last Dingo
Welcher Panzer außer vielleicht einem Merk Mrk.IV ist den nicht ohne zusätzliche Ausstattung für ein Szenario wie Irak schlecht ausgestattet?


Der Ausrüstungsstand der Anderen ist bei dem Anspruch der Amis irrelevant. Die wollen -wie wohl jeder - geeignetes Gerät haben.
Da ist es kein Trost, dass die meisten Anderen auch deutlich suboptimal ausgerüstet sind. Zumal einige andere Länder weiter fleißig ihre Kampfpanzer weiter entwickeln bzw. neue Modelle einführen - und die Amis nur einen 70er Jahre Entwurf upgraden.


--------------------
 
harmlos
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 10:27 | Beitrag #16
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberst
Beiträge: 3.910



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 23.07.2001


@Lastdingo: Welcher Panzer ist dem M1 den nennenswert überlegen? Und wieso sollte man einen KPz ausschließlich auf LIC auslegen?

@Warhammer: Das neue Fahrzeug entspricht von den Abmessungen her dem M1, den die Amerikaner seit bald zehn Jahren im Irak im Einsatz haben, und der davor auch schon in X anderen Ländern im Einsatz war. Wenn das Fahrzeug nennenswert kleiner werden soll, muss man bei zwei der drei Anforderungen Abstriche machen. Erklär mir doch mal konkret, wie 40 cm weniger Breite oder 1 m weniger Länge in einer Ortschaft einen nennenswerten Unterschied machen? Insbesondere die Länge - auch in Afghanistan ist jeder LKW länger.

Anderes Beispiel: die CV90 der Dänen in Afghanistan, die gegenüber KPz oder Fahrzeugen wie Puma/GCV gerade den Vorteil geringer Breite haben. Und was machen die Dänen? Schrauben einen SLAT-Käfig drumrum - jetzt haben sie die gleichen Abmessungen wie die großen Fahrzeuge, aber trotzdem keine richtige Panzerung.

Der Beitrag wurde von harmlos bearbeitet: 23. May 2010, 16:11


--------------------
Die ZDV liegt - gottseidank - in irgendeinem Panzerschrank.
Bei irgendeinem fremden Mann, der sie bestimmt nicht brauchen kann.
 
xena
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 16:16 | Beitrag #17
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 4.713



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 03.10.2002


ZITAT(lastdingo @ 22. May 2010, 14:55) *
ZITAT(Warhammer @ 22. May 2010, 16:16) *
Wo kommt denn jetzt schon wieder die Idee her, dass der M1 suboptimal ist?


Vom übertriebenen Spritverbrauch, der Notwendigkeit ihn wesentlich upzugraden für den Einsatz gegen erbärmlichst ausgerüstete Gegner oder der Tatsache, dass das Design so alt ist wie ich?


Das Alter spielt keine Rolle. Alle heutigen Panzer sind oder basieren auf ältere Kaltekriegszenarien Geräte. Alle sind für die Bekämpfung stark gepanzerter Gegner optimiert. Keiner von denen ist tatsächlich für die heutige Lage hin optimiert. Das Traurige daran ist ja, daß die Technik so teuer geworden ist, daß man nicht zeitoptimiert mit geeignetem Gerät auf vorhandene bedrohungen reagieren kann. Weil es zu teuer ist und weil komplizierte Technik Zeit zum reifen braucht.

Selbst die neueren Entwürfe, wie Leclerc und K2, basieren noch auf alte Traditionen. Sie sind ökonomisch auf reduziertem Personal hin optimiert, verbrauchen weniger Sprit, haben automatische Lader, modernste Feuerleitsysteme usw, aber vom Konzept her hat sich absolut nichts geändert. Somit ist es egal ob ein Panzer 30 Jahre alt ist oder erst heute morgen vom Band gerollt ist. Daß ein Panzer älter ist als man selbst, ist kein Argument.


--------------------
Eine komplette Waffenübersicht (naja, fast komplett... ...naja auch nicht fast komplett, aber sehr vieles...):

waffen-der-welt.alices-world.de

 
lastdingo
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 16:32 | Beitrag #18
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Major
Beiträge: 6.191



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 04.12.2001


@harmlos:
Ich habe nicht "ausschließlich" geschrieben, also bitte kein Stohmannargument hier.
Wer jedoch einen KPz für "LIC" auslegt, der legt ihn gegen Infanterie und anderen Widerstand zu Fuß aus - also gegen 95% der gegnerischen Armee.
Der Panzervernichtungsfokus der 70er und 80er Jahre Entwürfe ist suboptimal an sich.


@Xena:
30 Jahre als zu sein bedeutet, die technologischen Fortschritte von dreißig Jahren nur teilweise zu nutzen.

Im Übrigen lohnt es sich wohl, mich hier zu wiederholen:
"Der Ausrüstungsstand der Anderen ist bei dem Anspruch der Amis irrelevant. Die wollen -wie wohl jeder - geeignetes Gerät haben."


Mir ist immer wieder unverständlich, warum man hier Diskussionen zu einzelnen Wörtern führt, selbst wenn diese Wörter rein sachlich völlig korrekt sind.
Selbstverständlich ist der Abrams suboptimal, ebenso wie alles Andere. Es geht um den Grad der Suboptimalität, die Ansprüche, Bedürfnisse etc.

Da kann man z.B. drüber sprechen, warum die Japaner einen KPz von 44 t neu entwickelt haben und ob der Abrams im Hügelgelände Koreas so gut zurecht kommt wie der K2, der ein ganz anderes Fahrwerk hat. Aber suboptimal war der Abrams schon von Anfang an. Nicht nur wegen der anfänglichen 105mm Bewaffnung, sondern schlicht und einfach deshalb, weil seine Beschaffung eine versteckte Subvention für einen kriselnden Konzern war, denn der Alternativentwurf wurde für überlegen befunden.


--------------------
 
harmlos
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 16:38 | Beitrag #19
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberst
Beiträge: 3.910



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 23.07.2001


ZITAT(lastdingo @ 23. May 2010, 16:32) *
@harmlos:
Ich habe nicht "ausschließlich" geschrieben, also bitte kein Stohmannargument hier.
Wer jedoch einen KPz für "LIC" auslegt, der legt ihn gegen Infanterie und anderen Widerstand zu Fuß aus - also gegen 95% der gegnerischen Armee.
Der Panzervernichtungsfokus der 70er und 80er Jahre Entwürfe ist suboptimal an sich.


Welche Armee besteht denn zu 95 % aus Infantrie? Und wieviel Prozent der Kampfkraft hat die Infantrie? Der ist so gut wie vernachlässigbar. Mit Infantrie gewinnt man weder Schlachten noch kriege, deswegen sind Panzer auch nicht zur reinen Infantriebekämpfung ausgelegt. Das können Sie gut genug, auch ohne Modifikationen.


--------------------
Die ZDV liegt - gottseidank - in irgendeinem Panzerschrank.
Bei irgendeinem fremden Mann, der sie bestimmt nicht brauchen kann.
 
xena
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 17:02 | Beitrag #20
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 4.713



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 03.10.2002


Nur es gibt heute kaum Panzerschlachten. Bei den meisten Ländern mit starken Panzerverbänden sind die geografischen Gegebenheiten inzwischen geklärt und alle haben sich damit abgefunden und sind sogar wirtschaftlich eng verbunden. Die wenigen die sich noch um Territorien streiten sind in Afrika und die haben kein Geld für Panzer oder im Kaukasus, die auch keine klassischen Panzerschlachten zustande bringen. Der Großteil der Konflikte wird guerillamäßig ausgetragen, mit schweren Panzern wird gedroht, der Konflikt wird aber oft zu Fuß ausgetragen. Für letzteres Szenario sind nur wenige Armeen ausgelegt bzw. zusätzlich ausgelegt. Die USA haben aus Vietnam kaum gelernt und haben sich erst in Afghanistan wieder auf diese Kriegsführung eingestellt, bzw sind noch dabei es zu tun und lernen immer noch.

Irgendwie habe ich das Gefühl, daß Politiker, die für die Genehmigung und Beschaffung zuständig, wie auch die Militärs, die für die Bedarfsanalyse und Aufstellung der Forderungen gegenüber den Politikern zuständig sind, mit der derzeitigen Situation überfordert sind und mit den extrem schnell wechselnden Gegebenheiten kaum zurecht kommen.


--------------------
Eine komplette Waffenübersicht (naja, fast komplett... ...naja auch nicht fast komplett, aber sehr vieles...):

waffen-der-welt.alices-world.de

 
harmlos
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 17:09 | Beitrag #21
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberst
Beiträge: 3.910



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 23.07.2001


Andererseits gehen von den LICs keine nennenswerten Bedrohungen für uns aus, so daß es sinnvoll ist, sich nicht nur darauf zu konzentrieren. Die Beschaffung von MRAPs ist viel sinnvoller als seine KPz zu kompromittieren. Wenn es wirklich zu Gefechten kommt, haben die KPz im Irak und Afghanistan doch gezeigt, das sie dafür auch weiterhin die beste Option sind. Ein paar Schilde für den Gunner und Seitenschürzen dranzuschrauben ist ja keine Änderung des Konzeptes.

Wir driften ab. Die Anforderungen an das GCV bestätigt doch nur, das Fahrzeuge, die gemeinsam eingesetzt werden, den gleichen Schutz bieten und über die selbe Mobilität verfügen müssen. Und das Panzerung und Feuerkraft durch nichts zu ersetzen ist - außer durch mehr davon.

Der Beitrag wurde von harmlos bearbeitet: 23. May 2010, 17:12


--------------------
Die ZDV liegt - gottseidank - in irgendeinem Panzerschrank.
Bei irgendeinem fremden Mann, der sie bestimmt nicht brauchen kann.
 
xena
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 17:14 | Beitrag #22
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 4.713



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 03.10.2002


Aber optimal ist es auch nicht. So wird suboptimales Gerät weiterhin gebrauchsfähig gehalten. Die Israelis wären mit ihren sehr gut geschützten Schützenpanzern auf dem besten Weg, ihnen fehlt nur die Feuerkraft (OK, das machen sie mit ihren Merkavas, aber das ist wiederum für ihr Szenario vor der Haustür sinnvoll).


--------------------
Eine komplette Waffenübersicht (naja, fast komplett... ...naja auch nicht fast komplett, aber sehr vieles...):

waffen-der-welt.alices-world.de

 
harmlos
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 17:23 | Beitrag #23
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberst
Beiträge: 3.910



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 23.07.2001


Optimal kann sich keiner leisten. Und die Probleme mit den KPz waren doch von allen Fahrzeugen die kleinsten.

1. HMMWV - komplett zurückgezogen, durch MRAP ersetzt wg. unzureichendem Schutz.
2. Bradley - komplett zurückgezogen wegen unzureichendem Schutz
3. M1 - kleines Upgrade

Nachdem die MRAPs das erste Problem soweit gelöst haben, wird jetzt das zweite gelöst. Beachtlich auch, das alle Fahrzeuge durch wesentlich schwerere ersetzt wurden/werden.


--------------------
Die ZDV liegt - gottseidank - in irgendeinem Panzerschrank.
Bei irgendeinem fremden Mann, der sie bestimmt nicht brauchen kann.
 
Panzermann
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 19:01 | Beitrag #24
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberstleutnant
Beiträge: 11.635



Gruppe: VIP
Mitglied seit: 19.11.2002


Panzerung und damit Schutz gibt es eben nicht zum Nulltarif. Sagt ja auch Gen. Chiarelli, und es soll ein größerer Absitztrupp rein als im Bradley, was heißt mehr umpanzerter Raum gleich mehr Gewicht. Wenn man das will muß man eben auch das Gewicht hinnehmen.


--------------------
ZITAT(Hawkeye @ 28. Mar 2011, 04:37) *
Tipp des Tages:
.454 Casull Flachkopf-Massivgeschosse eignen sich hervorragend als Ohrenstöpsel!
 
lastdingo
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 20:41 | Beitrag #25
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Major
Beiträge: 6.191



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 04.12.2001


ZITAT(harmlos @ 23. May 2010, 17:38) *
ZITAT(lastdingo @ 23. May 2010, 16:32) *
@harmlos:
Ich habe nicht "ausschließlich" geschrieben, also bitte kein Stohmannargument hier.
Wer jedoch einen KPz für "LIC" auslegt, der legt ihn gegen Infanterie und anderen Widerstand zu Fuß aus - also gegen 95% der gegnerischen Armee.
Der Panzervernichtungsfokus der 70er und 80er Jahre Entwürfe ist suboptimal an sich.


Welche Armee besteht denn zu 95 % aus Infantrie? Und wieviel Prozent der Kampfkraft hat die Infantrie? Der ist so gut wie vernachlässigbar. Mit Infantrie gewinnt man weder Schlachten noch kriege, deswegen sind Panzer auch nicht zur reinen Infantriebekämpfung ausgelegt. Das können Sie gut genug, auch ohne Modifikationen.


"Infanterie und anderen Widerstand zu Fuß aus - also gegen 95% der gegnerischen Armee"
vs.
"Welche Armee besteht denn zu 95 % aus Infantrie?"


Du siehst das Problem?

Im Übrigen bestand die nordkoreanische Armee 1950/51 aus etwa 95% Infanterie was die Divisionen an der Front anging, weil einfach alle mitmachten, sogar offensiv.


--------------------
 
Delta
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 21:51 | Beitrag #26
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Generalmajor
Beiträge: 6.890



Gruppe: Moderator.WHQ
Mitglied seit: 08.04.2002


Ich sehe irgendwie das Problem gerade nicht ganz, das man hier dem M1 unterstellt. Als Kampfpanzer hat er in den vergangenen 20 Jahren alle Aufgaben ziemlich eindeutig zu seinen Gunsten gelöst und damit mithin das gehalten, wofür er gebaut wurde. Und ein neuer ernstzunehmender Gegner für den man zwangsläufig einen neuen Panzer bräuchte, sehe ich nicht. Dass man ein 30 Jahre altes Design verbessern kann, stelle ich nicht in Frage, allerdings wurde in den letzten 30 Jahren auch viel verschlimmbessert, weil falsche Annahmen getroffen, Vorgaben gemacht und umgesetzt wurden. Die KWS1 des Leopard 2 ist beispielsweise eine, bei den Amerikanern war es imo der NCW-Hype, der im Future Combat Systems Programm mündete und in die Grossgeräteentwicklung der USA eine 10jährige Lücke vertaner Arbeit und Zeit gerissen hat.
Und beim SPz ist man im Endeffekt jetzt nach 20 Jahren weitestgehendem Stillstand wohl doch bei einem gepimpten Marder 2 angelangt.

Bzgl. "Infanterie und anderen Widerstand zu Fuß": Das ist mir als Vorgabe zu pauschal. Gegen 90% der 95% (alle Flintenträger) würde man auch heute noch ganz ordentlich mit einem Mk. IV abschneiden. Offensiv sind Fußtruppen gegen vorbereitete mechanisierte Verbände chancenlos, defensiv aus ausgebauten Stellungen kämpfend, können sie mechanisierten Kräften ebenbürtig sein (siehe Libanon). Und im "LIC" reden wir meist von Hinterhalten und Handstreichen. Ein guter, von langer Hand geplanter Hinterhalt sollte die Feindkräfte, die in ihn hineingeraten eigentlich in Stücke reissen. Das passiert beispielsweise in Afghanistan sehr selten und liegt meiner Meinung nach nicht ausschliesslich am Dilettantismus der INS, sondern auch an Qualität der Ausrüstung und der Ausbildung daran seitens ISAF. Wenn Fahrzeuge verloren gehen, dann in 90% der Fälle in den ersten Minuten eines Gefechts, so lange INS noch die Initiative und vorbereitete Sprengfallen haben. Danach gibts für die idR keinen Blumentopf mehr zu gewinnen. Einen Erkenntnisgewinn für dem Bau neuer Gefechtsfahrzeuge kann ich dort jedenfalls - ausser der Notwendigkeit eines gewissen Schutzniveaus - nicht sehen, Aber ich lasse mich gern erleuchten.







--------------------
Thou canst not kill that which doth not live. But you can blast it into chunky kibbles.
 
lastdingo
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 22:11 | Beitrag #27
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Major
Beiträge: 6.191



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 04.12.2001


Nun, die Russen hatten mit konventionell bewaffneten und geschützten Kampfpanzern nicht nur in der Stadt, sondern auch in hügeligem Gelände so ihre Probleme gegen die Tschetschenen.

Waffen wie die RPG-29 mit ihren gerade mal 105mm Kaliber (es gibt diverse 110, 115 und 120mm tragbare Panzerabwehrwaffen mit 300+ m Reichweite) sind von der Seite her schon zu viel für Kampfpanzer, die gegen T-72 optimiert wurden.

Die Rohrerhöhung ist bei den meisten Kampfpanzern zu gering für welliges Gelände (die Koreaner z.B. können mit ihren hydropneumatischen Fahrwerken etwas tricksen).

Gewichte von über 60 t und entsprechend große Bodendruckspitzen waren für WK3 Planungen in Deutschland adequat, doch in vielen Ländern (mitunter am neuen Rand der NATO) sind solche Bodendrücke und Gewichte (Brücken) inakzeptabel.


Und ganz ehrlich; deine Mk.IV Bemerkung war erheblich überspitzt. Bundeswehrköche aus den 70ern hätten Mk.IV schon mit Lanze locker abgeschlachtet so lange die Mun reicht. Zudem hatte ich ja über den Fokus der Auslegung gespchrieben - den würde man heute nicht mehr so auf T-xx zerstören legen, sondern mehr auf den Kampf gegen Kämpfer zu Fuß (inklusive besserem Seitenschutz statt maximiertem Frontalschutz).

"Offensiv sind Fußtruppen gegen vorbereitete mechanisierte Verbände chancenlos ..."
Nur in einem für Letztere vorteilhaftem Gelände. Solche Geländeformen gibt's aber imer weniger, und die Problematik um das Gewicht schränkt die Panzerkdt weiter in ihren Optionen ein. Die modernen mechanisierten Verbände haben auch immer noch keine zufriedenstellende eigene Antwort auf die Infiltrationstaktik der Nordkoreaner und Chinesen aus dem Koreakrieg.


Aber in diesen Punkten wird das GCV wohl auch keine Antwort beiten, wenn es so schwer wird wie zur Zeit öffentlich vermutet.


--------------------
 
Delta
Beitrag 23. May 2010, 22:42 | Beitrag #28
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Generalmajor
Beiträge: 6.890



Gruppe: Moderator.WHQ
Mitglied seit: 08.04.2002


Zusammengefasst muss das Kampffahrzeug von morgen (eigentlich von heute) also einen erhöhten Rundumschutz gegen Hohlladung und Minen/Sprengfallen aufweisen, adäquate Bewaffnung mit ausreichendem Höhenrichtbereich besitzen (SPz bringen das meist schon mit) und eine brauchbare Absitzstärke aufnehmen können um brauchbar gegen Feind vorgehen zu können. Das bedeutet für einen SPz eine Gefechtsmasse von 35-40to für 6-7 Mann Absitzstärke (aus der aktuellen Praxis), und man kann wohl ungefähr rechnen, dass das Teil alle 2 Mann mehr 50cm länger und 5-8to schwerer wird. Für eine Vollgruppe mit 10-12 Mann sind wir dann wohl tatsächlich im >50to-Bereich. Da man um die Heckklappenviecher drumrumbauen muss und die sich nicht wirklich komprimieren lassen, sehe ich keine grosse Möglichkeit, das zu reduzieren. ausser man kommt auf eine geniale Anordnung, wie man die a) platzsparend unterbringen und b) trotzdem schnell geschützt absitzen lassen kann.

In der Gewichtsgrößenordnung liesse sich wohl heute auch ein Kampfpanzer bauen, der die Anforderungen erfüllt. Auch wenn ich nach wie vor ein Freund eines Ladeschützen bin, sehe ich hier volumenmässiges Einsparpotenzial von 2-3m³, die eine erhebliche Geichtsreduzierung mit sich bringen würden. Dito besatzungsloser Turm. Da ginge schon etwas. Auf der anderen Seite sehe ich gerade den Leidensdruck nicht, mit dem so eine Entwicklung übers Knie gebrochen werden müsste. Eine Brücke, die 50to hält, hält meist auch 60 to; ich sehe die Problematik eher bei der Fahrzeugbreite und den allgemeinen Ausmaßen, wobei ich mir nicht sicher bin, ob sich eine stabile Waffenplattform mit Kettenfahrwerk unter 3m Breite realisieren lässt.


--------------------
Thou canst not kill that which doth not live. But you can blast it into chunky kibbles.
 
xena
Beitrag 24. May 2010, 14:19 | Beitrag #29
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 4.713



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 03.10.2002


In einer modernen Armee kann man den Soldaten, die oft freiwillig dienen, keine billigen Blechdosen mehr zumuten. In einer Gesellschaft wo Sicherheit eine immer größere Rolle spielt muß auch für den Soldaten immer mehr Schutz geboten werden. Von daher kann der Trend nur zu immer schwereren Fahrzeugen gehen.

Der nächste Punkt ist ja, daß man es heute kaum mit geordneten Kräften zu tun hat. Die aggieren nicht auf dem freien Feld, sonder da, wo Macht und Einfluß ausgeübt wird, also in urbanen Strukturen. Dort ist ein klassischer Kampfpanzer aber nicht optimal. Klar wird der heute dort eingesetzt, aber eher weil man nichts anderes hat. Der Wille nach Vereinheitlichung und schlanker Truppen mag ja für eine reine Selbstverteidigungsarmee ökonomisch sinnvoll sein, aber es wird den immer breiter gefächerten Aufgaben nicht mehr gerecht. Eine Moderne Armee muß heute also nicht mehr nur reine Kampfpanzer führen, sondern auch schwergepanzerte Einheiten mit entsprechender Feuerpower für den urbanen Kampf. Also Schutz für die eigene Infantrie und dazu kräftige Feuerunterstützung bieten, was etwas weiter geht, als derzeitige Schützenpanzer. Vom Fahrzeug her dürften aktuelle israelische Schützenpanzer gut geeignet sein, kombiniert mit Bewaffnungen wie dieses russische Infanterieunterstützungsfahrzeug auf T-55 Basis... wie hieß es nochmal? grübel... D.H. ein Fahrzeug das rundherum Schutz vor HEAT-Geschoßen bietet und nicht nur auf frontalen Schutz optimiert ist.

Der Beitrag wurde von xena bearbeitet: 24. May 2010, 14:21


--------------------
Eine komplette Waffenübersicht (naja, fast komplett... ...naja auch nicht fast komplett, aber sehr vieles...):

waffen-der-welt.alices-world.de

 
Shakraan
Beitrag 24. May 2010, 17:45 | Beitrag #30
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberleutnant
Beiträge: 2.076



Gruppe: VIP
Mitglied seit: 03.06.2006


du meinst wohl den Terminator auf T-72 Basis.


--------------------
 
 
 

5 Seiten V   1 2 3 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic


1 Besucher lesen dieses Thema (Gäste: 1 | Anonyme Besucher: 0)
0 Mitglieder:




Vereinfachte Darstellung Aktuelles Datum: 2. October 2014 - 13:25