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> Entwicklungen und News, ...rund um die Infanterie
Nite
Beitrag 31. May 2007, 21:52 | Beitrag #31
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Generalmajor d.R.
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Wer erinnert sich noch an CornerShot?
Hier die neueste Erfindung aus der VR China:
Bild: http://img217.imageshack.us/img217/1458/74172729dw8.jpg (Bild automatisch entfernt)
ZITAT
A visitor looks at a Chinese made HD66 nonlinear observation flat system for special forces, during the China international exhibition on police equipment and anti terrorism technology and equipment in central Beijing, 17 May 2007
Bild: http://img217.imageshack.us/img217/905/74193031ri0.jpg (Bild automatisch entfernt)
ZITAT
A visitor checks out a Chinese made weapons platform for the special police forces, at the eve of the China International Exhibition on Police Equipment and Anti Terrorism Technology and Equipment on May 16, 2007 in Beijing, China. The three-day exhibition opened on May 17.


Der Beitrag wurde von Nite bearbeitet: 31. May 2007, 21:53


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Ceterum censeo asseculas Dais esse necandam.

#flapjackmafia #GuaranáAntarctica #arrr #PyramidHoneyTruther
 
Major_Steiner
Beitrag 31. May 2007, 21:54 | Beitrag #32
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Hauptmann
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"Erfindung" in Anführungszeichen. Mit dem Copyright haben die es eben nicht so... wink.gif

Gruß,
Major Steiner

Der Beitrag wurde von Major_Steiner bearbeitet: 31. May 2007, 21:55


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Racer
Beitrag 1. Jun 2007, 23:50 | Beitrag #33
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LSAT
Bild: http://www.gun-world.net/usa/mg/lwmg/conf_3a_0017.jpg (Bild automatisch entfernt)
Kann sich noch jemand an die Studie für ein zukünftiges leichtes MG der Amis erinnern? Mit Teleskop oder hülsenloser Muition?

Hier ist ein Video mit dem Teleskopmunition Proto (bei 1:45):
Video

Hier noch Infos:
Infos
Infos2
Infos3



 
Major_Steiner
Beitrag 2. Jun 2007, 13:39 | Beitrag #34
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Hauptmann
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Kanada, Israel und andere kaufen CORAl-Systeme von Elbit Systems Ltd. für insgesamt 50 Mio. $.

Bild: http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/images/ELEC_Thermal_Imager_El-Op_CORAL_lg.jpg (Bild automatisch entfernt)

ZITAT
Elbit's Elop Sells $50M in CORAL NV Gear

Elbit Systems Electro-Optics Elop Ltd. ("Elop") announces several contracts valued at about $50 million to supply its hand-held CORAL Thermal Imaging night vision systems to the Canadian Forces, Israel's IDF, and "additional customers worldwide."

Elop's CORAL systems are compact and lightweight (less than 2.5 kg/ 5.5 pounds) thermal imaging viewers that are carried by an infantry soldier on a neck-strap. They can be used to view targets at night at tactical ranges, either from fixed positions or while in motion. The systems are also optimized for low energy consumption, which is important to already-overloaded infantry soldiers who would otherwise have to carry the additional batteries.


DID-Artikel
Release von Elbit Systems Ltd.
PDF über CORAL

Gruß,
Major Steiner


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Nite
Beitrag 2. Jun 2007, 15:38 | Beitrag #35
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Generalmajor d.R.
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ZITAT
Source: Jane's Defence Weekly, 30/5/07:

The USMC is seeking an Infantry Automatic Rifle (IAR) to replace the M249 SAW.

Lt Col Tracy Tafolla, project manager infantry weapons for USMC Systems Command, stated that a capabilities document outlining the requirements was expected to be issued within the next four to six weeks. The new weapon would be chambered in 5.56mm and would provide enhanced accuracy and reliability over the M249. Initial operating capability is expected in first quarter of 2009 FY.

Sources have described the IAR as being similar in concept to the BAR. It is clearly intended to be handier than the M249, which is more of a mini-GPMG.

Prototype contracts are said to have been issued in 2006 to FN Herstal and GD-Armament & Technical Products, but this seems odd if the USMC hasn't even sorted out the requirements yet. I would also be surprised if they omitted the STK Ultimax 100 at such an early date, since that seems to be the best match for what they want.


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Ceterum censeo asseculas Dais esse necandam.

#flapjackmafia #GuaranáAntarctica #arrr #PyramidHoneyTruther
 
Hummingbird
Beitrag 2. Jun 2007, 15:53 | Beitrag #36
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Es wird erhöhte Zuverlässigkeit für das neue SAW gefordert?
Gibt es beim Minimi da Probleme?
 
Whuffo
Beitrag 3. Jun 2007, 16:13 | Beitrag #37
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@ Hummingbird

http://images.military.com/pix/defensetech...d0015259_a2.pdf

ZITAT
The M9 and M249 were reported to have the most stoppages and the highest resulting negative impact.



Es gibt noch einen anderen, ähnlichen Bericht den ich gerade aber nicht finde.



Whuffo


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"I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac"
 
Hawkeye
Beitrag 14. Jun 2007, 09:58 | Beitrag #38
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ZITAT
USMC Seeks New LMG
by James Dunnigan
June 8, 2007
Discussion Board on this DLS topic

For the last two years, the U.S. Marine Corps has been shopping for a new light (5.56mm) machine-gun (LMG), to replace the M249, which the army and marines began using in the early 1980s. The marines have had a lot of complaints about the M249 in Iraq (jams from all the dust and sand), and many of the marine M249s are simply wearing out.

The new marine IAR (Infantry Automatic Rifle) must be between 10.5 and 12.5 pounds empty, use a large magazine (100 rounds or more) as well as the standard M-16 30 round magazine. The heavy barrel on the IAR must be able to handle sustained fire of 36-75 rounds a minute. The higher number is the ideal. It must have the standard rail on top for mounting accessories, be resistant to jamming from dust and sand and, in general, be a lot better than the M249. The marines will buy 4,000 weapons initially, and wants to do so soon.

The M249 weighs 15 pounds empty, and has been popular with the troops. But in over two decades, despite several tweaks to the basic design, many complaints have piled up. The marines were not the first ones to take action on a replacement. Three years ago SOCOM (U.S. Special Operations Command) began using the Mk 46 Light Machine Guns. This weapon is a modified version of the American M249 squad automatic weapon (SAW), which is in turn a modified version of a European design from the Belgian firm FN. The Mk 46 is lighter (13 pounds empty, 18 pounds loaded, with 200 rounds, compared to 22 pounds for the M249) and has the rail on top for the quick attachment of sights and such. The lighter weight is accomplished with a newly designed barrel, and removing various bits of hardware SOCOM didn't want. Added is a forward pistol grip and a detachable bipod. SOCOM likes to use the Mk 46 more like a "heavy assault rifle" than a "light machine-gun."

U.S. Army Special Forces pioneered the development of the 5.56mm light machine-gun four decades ago, when they obtained the first experimental models for use in Vietnam. The Special Forces and SEALs were very impressed with the light weight, and heavy firepower, from these weapons. But it took over a decade for the regular army to adopt such a weapon, mainly in response to the success the Russians were having with their own version of the lightweight squad machine-gun.

The army is also making noise about an M249 replacement, and are watching the marine competition with great interest. So far the marines have received interesting proposals from Colt and Ultimax (from Singapore).


Q: http://www.strategypage.com/dls/articles/20076825818.asp


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Proud member of Versoffener Sauhaufen™
 
goschi
Beitrag 24. Jul 2007, 14:51 | Beitrag #39
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http://www.armytimes.com/news/2007/07/army_rifle_070715/

kurz: der US kongress fordert eine Neubewertung des M4A1 Carbine in einer Staubumgebung, inkl. Vergleich zu den aktuellen Konkurenten (FN SCAR, Hk 416, (X)M8)

ZITAT
By Matthew Cox - Staff writer
Posted : Friday Jul 20, 2007 11:54:17 EDT

Yielding to congressional pressure, the Army will conduct a test in August to see if the M4 carbine soldiers take to war is the most reliable weapon available in sand-storm conditions.

The test will compare how the M4 performs against a select group of newer, more compact rifles when exposed to a “dust chamber” at the Army Test and Evaluation Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., said Col. Carl Lipsit, project manager for Soldier Weapons.

See the other rifles in action

[...]


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Die Eibohphobie, die Angst vor Palindromen, ist selbst ein Palindrom

Qui tacet, consentire videtur
ZITAT(KGB @ 17. Nov 2015, 12:54) *
Zitat Auto: "Brumm"
 
Praetorian
Beitrag 4. Aug 2007, 09:06 | Beitrag #40
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Und die Franzosen wollen auch was neues:

ZITAT
French DGA issues RFI for GPMGs
The French Délégation Générale pour l'Armement (DGA) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) covering 10,880 NATO-standard 7.62 mm x 51 mm general-purpose machine guns (GPMGs). The move signalled that the French armed forces' AANF1 GPMG is to be phased out.

Jane's Defence Weeky, 01. August 07


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This just in: Beverly Hills 90210 - Cleveland Browns 3
 
maschinenmensch
Beitrag 5. Aug 2007, 11:25 | Beitrag #41
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Spanien beschafft MG4:

HK-Meldung

Bin ja gespannt was die Franzosen für ein MG kaufen. Hat nicht GIAT Anteile an FN? Dann wäre das MAG ja die logische Wahl. Andererseits ist das vielleicht ein Anreiz für HK endlich mit der 7.62x51 Version des MG4 heraus zurücken. Wir werden sehen...

mm. out

Der Beitrag wurde von maschinenmensch bearbeitet: 5. Aug 2007, 11:35
 
KSK
Beitrag 5. Aug 2007, 11:35 | Beitrag #42
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ZITAT(maschinenmensch @ 5. Aug 2007, 12:25) [snapback]893002[/snapback]
Dann wäre das MAG ja die logische Wahl.



Naja, MAG und MG4 sind ja dann doch zwei untershciedliche Paar Schuhe, ich würde als Äquivalent zum MG4 (und wohl auch Vorbild dessen) eher das M249 SAW/Minimi sehen. Und zumindest in der Para-Version haben die Franzosen das schon länger im Einsatz.


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ZITAT(Nicht näher bekannter Dienstrecht-Dozent)
In 90% der Fälle gibt es nur einen Grund, für die Bewerbung im öffentlichen Dienst: Man ist nicht die hellste Kerze auf der Torte und braucht einen Studiengang ohne Mathematik.
 
maschinenmensch
Beitrag 5. Aug 2007, 11:41 | Beitrag #43
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Ich bezog mich mit dem Satz nach dem Link auf den Post von "Praetorian", wo von einer Ausschreibung für ein neues GPMG für die französische Armee berichtet wird. Und da geht es um 7.62x51, was HK im Bereich Gasdrucklader-MG noch nicht im Angebot hat. Also müsste ein MG4 im genannten Kaliber her. Alle Klarheiten beseitigt? smile.gif

mm. out

 
Holzkopp
Beitrag 5. Aug 2007, 16:53 | Beitrag #44
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Wobei mich da interessiert, was die Franzosen am ANF1 unzeitgemäß finden und was das Anforderungsprofil an das neue GPMG ist. Anders gefragt: was kann ein MAG besser als ein ANF1?

Weiter gedacht: was bietet der Markt in dem Segment denn noch was als Ersatz Sinn macht?


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Das ständige Nachgeben der Klugen begründet die Diktatur der Dummen.
 
Kreuz As
Beitrag 6. Aug 2007, 20:11 | Beitrag #45
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Thema abgetrennt.
 
anschobi
Beitrag 24. Aug 2007, 15:14 | Beitrag #46
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ein neues sniper rifle bei der us army
ist auch ein interessanter abschnitt über das m14 dabei
ZITAT
The Army's New Sniper Rifle
Soldier of Fortune | Gary Paul Johnston | August 21, 2007
By now it is well known that the U.S. Army established a need to standardize a sniper rifle in 7.62x51mm NATO caliber. This was necessary in order to field one such rifle for precision sniping and to replace the literal myriad of sniper rifles currently in the system. For the record, these sniper rifles include the venerable M14 semi-automatic rifle and the M24 Remington bolt action rifle, the Mk 11 and others, which have been purchased by individual SOCOM units.

In the wake of 9/11 and America's entry into the Global War On Terrorism (G-WOT), most of the remaining 40,000 M14 rifles in the U.S. military's inventory (mostly the U.S. Navy) have been taken out of storage in order to be re-built as precision semi-automatic rifles for sniping use. Many of these rifles that weren't destroyed during the Clinton Era were given to "friendly" countries and there has also begun a move to "buy" some of them back.

The M14's popularity as a sniper rifle dates back to its development as a National Match competition rifle during the 1960's, its evolution into the M21 Sniper Rifle used in the Vietnam War, and its evolution into the XM25 Sniper Rifle by the U.S. Army and Navy in the years that followed. Properly fitted, the M14 is capable of extremely good accuracy and is highly reliable, but it has had less than optimum results from being used with a sound suppressor. Still, the M14 has made the transition into a 21st Century Sniper Rifle as the DMR (Designated Marksman Rifle) by the United States Marine Corps and its more recent transformation by the U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM).

Being a highly modified Model 700 Remington bolt-action repeating rifle, the M24 is capable of great precision accuracy. However, lessons were relearned in Somalia and in target-rich environments encountered in the G-WOT that a self-loading rifle can be fired in succession 4 to 5 times faster than a bolt action rifle. Thus, the Army was determined to standardize a semi-automatic sniper rifle.

The third rifle mentioned is the Mk 11, a refined version of the SR- 25 (Stoner Rifle-25) rifle, which is made by Knight's Armament Company, of Titusville, Florida. Like the others, the Mk 11 is chambered for the 7.6x51mm NATO cartridge, but it contains modifications dictated by the U.S. Navy SEALS, which is a member of the SOCOM. However, using the Mk 11 identified issues that the Army found desirable in an AR10-style sniper rifle.

In an effort to obtain an optimum 7.62mm NATO Sniper Rifle, the Army issued a solicitation for a rifle to meet the specification of what it called the Semi-Automatic Sniper System (SASS). Note that, as opposed to the Mk 11 Sniper Rifle and others, the rifle meeting SASS requirements would not be produced in selective fire. Previously, some self-loading sniper rifles were looked upon as support weapons for the main sniper rifle, which was often a bolt-action repeater. While these self-loading support sniper rifles could be used alongside the repeating rifle, they were not considered as being on a par with the primary sniping rifle, but could be used in a selective fire role in case of an attack.

With the obvious merits of current self-loading sniper rifles, these weapons came to be seen as the potential equal to the bolt-action repeater in accuracy, not to mention their superiority in a target rich environment such as has been common in the G-WOT. Filling this requirement was the underlying factor of the SASS Program. The rifle itself was designated the XM110.

Without re-printing the myriad requirements of the SASS Program, the two main points of the rifle was that it was to be chambered for the 7.62x51mm NATO (.308 Winchester) cartridge, and that it be capable of semi-automatic ONLY fire. The current trend is for the sniper to transport his precision rifle slung while using an M4 or similar 5.56mm rifle for close-range defense in route, and to defend his position once deployed.

In addition to the above requirements, SASS candidate rifles were to be M1913 ("Picatinny") friendly in terms of mounting a wide range of optics and other accessories, and be able to mount a sound suppressor and a bipod. Also specified were a "Match Grade" trigger, a 20-round magazine, an adjustable butt stock, and a high degree of accuracy.

A number of manufacturers answered the SASS solicitation with a variety of rifles based on either the AR-10 design or that of the FN-FAL. While all of these rifles, no doubt, performed well, where all categories were considered, one would float to the top, and that was the submission from Knight's Armament Company (KAC). Each company submitted five rifles and each was subjected to a variety of testing criteria. All five samples were later returned to each company with a full performance report and only the company that submitted the rifles would see the report on how its rifles performed.

Report Card With a Gold Star

While I was not able to examine the reports of other submissions, I do have a copy of the report furnished to the winner, KAC. Among a long list of other impressive performances, the KAC SASS submission averaged 0.65-inch minute of angle (MOA) accuracy. While the rifles submitted by other manufacturers may be billed by names containing the acronym "SASS," only the KAC rifle was given the US Military designation XM110.

After first seeing the KAC XM110 at the 2006 SHOT Show, I got a closer look at it several months later during the National Defense Industries Association (NDIA) meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where I also saw it fired by Colonel David Lutz, USMC (ret.). Soon after, I traveled to KAC's facility in Titusville, Florida, where the XM110 is produced, for an in-depth glimpse of why the rifle won the XM110 contract.

Like the original Stoner-designed Armalite AR-10 rifle built by Armalite during the early 1950's and the AR- 15/M16, SR-25 and Mk 11 rifles that followed, the XM110 operates by direct gas instead of using a gas piston system. In all of these rifles and their many clones, high-pressure gas is directed from a port in the barrel back through a tube and into the rifle's bolt carrier, which in this case acts as the rifle's gas cylinder. As the hot gas expands inside the carrier, it drives the carrier rearward against the back of the rifle's bolt, which here acts as the gas piston. As this occurs, equal gas pressure pushes forward against the bolt, thereby taking some of the rearward load away from this part and reducing the wear on its bolt lugs.

Since both the bolt and carrier travel back and forth the full-length of the operation, using the late Colonel George Chinn's description of weapon operating systems, the above rifles could be classed as long-stroke gas cylinder and piston via direct gas.

Design, Materials and Execution

Based on Eugene Stoner's original AR-10 design, the XM110 is the latest word in the SR-25 and Mk 11, which evolved from that 60-year old design. However, the original wellproven design is only refined and is not really changed.

The one change that could be called revolutionary is in the design of the locking lugs of the bolt. Not being interchangeable with any other AR-10 descendant, this bolt is far stronger than the original.

First appearing in KAC's SR-15 and SR-16 rifles, these radiused locking lugs along with a balanced extractor and other features defined these 5.56mm rifles as arguably the finest AR-15 variants on the planet. While the selective-fire SR- 16 continues in production for the military, the semi-automatic SR-15 was sadly discontinued in the wake of Nine-Eleven due to expanding military requirements. Hopefully, with KAC's giant new facility, SR-15 production will resume.

Other, less subtle changes in the XM110 include KAC's new URX (Upper Rail Extension) system, ambidextrous magazine release and a butt stock that is adjustable for length of pull. This stock also has a monopod for elevation.

Now incorporated on all KAC Stoner-type rifles, the URX rail system locks rigidly onto the barrel by tightening a nut in a method very similar to securing the barrel of a Savage Model 110 rifle. However, the top rail of the URX is first perfectly aligned with that of the upper receiver using a special fixture, and the front sight folds down into the URX rail to become part of it, when not in use. The result is a top rail as true as a monolithic system.

Quite ingenious is KAC's new ambidextrous magazine release. Effective, but simple, the release button on the left side is similar to that on the right, but is slightly lower and pivots to cam the release. This new ambidextrous release system will be incorporated into all KAC rifles.

Although it resembles a standard SR-25 fixed stock, the butt stock of the XM110 is adjustable for length of pull by turning a knurled wheel in the stock to extend or retract the butt plate. The vertical monopod raises and lowers the butt for elevation.

Using the finest materials available, more than thirty of the most modern CNC machines produce the components of the XM110 and other rifles, as well as the KAC XM110 Sound Suppressor and other KAC products, such as the company's family of night-vision optics. All components are accordingly heat treated and finished in-house in order to maintain 100% quality control. The finish on the XM110 is the Army's new Flat Dark Earth (FDE).

KAC's Sound Suppressor

A key component of the XM110 package is the quick-attachable Knight Armament suppressor designed for it. Locating on the flash hider, this suppressor extends back to the gas block where its yoke-like locking device is pressed down to secure the suppressor to the gas block. Once mounted, the suppressor is sealed and provides a sound reduction of 30 decibels.

Optics, Bipod and Carrying Case

Virtually the only items in the XM110 package not produced by KAC are the telescopic sight, bipod and carrying case. Stemming from an "if you can't beat'em, buy'em." philosophy, KAC furnishes each XM110 with a Leupold 3.5-10X30mm Sniper Scope, a Harris bipod and a Hardigg Storm Case.

Leupold scopes are pretty much standard throughout the U.S. Military, as are Harris Bipods. The Leupold Sniper Scope is rugged and precise and the Harris Bipod is lightweight yet tough enough for the job, and it performs. I've always maintained that extra weight in a bipod is excess weight, and the Harris proves this.

A relative newcomer to the tactical scene, the Hardigg Storm Case was an easy sell, as Hardigg cases are heads above all others, and are available for a variety of items in addition to the XM110. They also come fitted for a number of firearms and their interiors can also be custom laser cut for anything that will fit in their wide range of sizes. If that's not enough, Hardigg Cases can be had in many colors. As are virtually all aspects of the XM110 package, the Hardigg Storm Case comes in FDE color, and it holds the rifle along with spare magazines, ammunition, KAC Sound Suppressor and an Otis U.S. Military .30 caliber cleaning kit that is also standard XM110 equipment.

Trigger Time

Speaking of triggers, did I forget to mention the KAC Match Trigger? Another standard on the XM110, this two-stage trigger is precisely made and tuned at the factory to break crisply at about 3 pounds. This weight is ideal for both safety and accuracy and is the weight I prefer for all precision rifle shooting.

At the KAC range the XM110 was fired with and without the sound suppressor, and with the suppressor mounted, ear protection was not mandatory. In fact, as far as I was concerned, ear protection wasn't necessary at all. Recoil was mild and the rifle did not malfunction in any way during an afternoon of shooting at various targets.

The XM110 was fired prone from its Harris Bipod as well as a GPS Grip- Pod. Both worked well in supporting the rifle and the GripPod weighs but a fraction of the weight.

While only informal shooting was done by a number of people with the sample rifle, I've been shooting SR-25 rifles for years, and I can attest to their consistent sub-minute of angle (MOA) accuracy.

As this is written, the KAC XM110 has dropped its experimental status and has been type classified as the M110 Sniper Rifle. As such it is slated to replace all 7.62mm NATO caliber sniper rifles in the system, both selfloading and bolt-action. Only time will tell, but KAC was in full production of the rifle when I was there.

Will the M110 be available outside the U.S. Military? Yes, but only once military contracts are filled. You can buy one of the other SASS submission rifles, but not the M110, at least not yet. Also, the commercial variant may not carry the exact M110 designation, as is often common with a commercial version of a current military weapon. Either way, it will be the real McCoy and 100% MilStd.

In the meantime, the SR-25 and commercial versions of the Mk 11 in both rifle and carbine configurations are available.


Der Beitrag wurde von anschobi bearbeitet: 24. Aug 2007, 15:14


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„You can have my gun when you can pry it loose from my cold, dead hand“
"When an armed man guardeth his home, thieves are as Swiss-cheese in the night air."
- Book of Stoner, Chapter 15, Verse 223
 
Glorfindel
Beitrag 24. Aug 2007, 17:33 | Beitrag #47
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Eigentlich nichts neues. Die Entscheidung die M24 durch die XM110 (aka SR-25) zu ersetzten ist schon zwei Jahre alt. Die Marines haben das SR-25 schon eingeführt. Grundsätzlich führen die "Squad Designated Marksmen" standardmässig das M24 wie auch daneben M16 oder M4 (airborne) mit ACOG-Optik. Anscheinend will man jedoch ein (halb-)automatisches Gewehr, weshalb auf Stufe Brigade oder Division zusätzlich noch die M14 eingeführt wurden. Dies ist auch der Grund weshalb diverse unterschiedliche M14-Modifikationen im Umlauf sind. Es ist auch zu bedenken, dass DSM eben keine Sniper sind. Ich denke das M14 ist gerade deshalb so beliebt, weil es eine halbautomatische Waffe ist. Die M24 gehören weiterhin zur Standardausrüstung der SDM. Das M14 wird jedoch im Kurs für angehende Squad Designated Marksmen ausgebildet, v.a. neben M16 und M4.

Daneben führen auch die Sniper Teams immer wieder gerne M14. Für diese ist es aber ohnehin leichter andere Waffen zu erhalten. Auch bei den Sniper wird das XM110 das M24 ablösen. Die National Guard ist z.T. noch mit M21 ausgerüstet, bei der Army wurde das M24 schon längere Zeit ausser Dienst gestellt.


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"Dort stand das Haus der Goldenen Blume, deren Männer eine Strahlensonne auf den Schilden hatten und ihr Anführer, Glorfindel, trug einen Mantel so kunstvoll mit Goldfäden durchwirkt, dass er gelb durchschossen war wie ein Feld im Frühling; und ihre Waffen waren kunstvoll mit Gold überzogen."
 
Sergeant
Beitrag 24. Aug 2007, 19:11 | Beitrag #48
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ZITAT(KSK @ 5. Aug 2007, 10:35) [snapback]893003[/snapback]
ZITAT(maschinenmensch @ 5. Aug 2007, 12:25) [snapback]893002[/snapback]
Dann wäre das MAG ja die logische Wahl.



Naja, MAG und MG4 sind ja dann doch zwei untershciedliche Paar Schuhe, ich würde als Äquivalent zum MG4 (und wohl auch Vorbild dessen) eher das M249 SAW/Minimi sehen. Und zumindest in der Para-Version haben die Franzosen das schon länger im Einsatz.

Haben die Franzosen nicht irgendein eigenes MG, ein rein französisches ?


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Die technische Entwicklung in unserer Gesellschaft hat in ihrem Voranschreiten nicht vor, auf die Entwicklung des menschlichen Geistes zu warten.
( http://www.t-64.de )
 
Nite
Beitrag 24. Aug 2007, 19:17 | Beitrag #49
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Generalmajor d.R.
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Eben das AANF1 welches ersetzt werden soll...


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Ceterum censeo asseculas Dais esse necandam.

#flapjackmafia #GuaranáAntarctica #arrr #PyramidHoneyTruther
 
s3plan
Beitrag 25. Aug 2007, 11:59 | Beitrag #50
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Fähnrich
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ZITAT(Holzkopp @ 5. Aug 2007, 17:53) [snapback]893038[/snapback]
was kann ein MAG besser als ein ANF1?



funktionieren
 
Nite
Beitrag 25. Aug 2007, 12:03 | Beitrag #51
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Generalmajor d.R.
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Geht es vielleicht auch etwas präziser?


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Ceterum censeo asseculas Dais esse necandam.

#flapjackmafia #GuaranáAntarctica #arrr #PyramidHoneyTruther
 
s3plan
Beitrag 25. Aug 2007, 12:11 | Beitrag #52
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Fähnrich
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Das AAN F1 produziert Ladehemmungen am laufenden Band.

Der Beitrag wurde von s3plan bearbeitet: 25. Aug 2007, 12:19
 
Racer
Beitrag 1. Sep 2007, 21:16 | Beitrag #53
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Schnittbild des AN-94 "Abakan":

Abakan

Edit: Lieber Goschi, dann verschieb es doch bitte dahin wo es passen könnte. Besten Dank. Mir ist leider kein besserer Topic dazu eingefallen.

Der Beitrag wurde von Racer bearbeitet: 2. Sep 2007, 16:59
 
goschi
Beitrag 1. Sep 2007, 22:18 | Beitrag #54
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Herr der Dunkelheit
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das versteht man eher weniger unter "News" (das Entwicklungen ist in diesem kontext zu sehen...) rolleyes.gif


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Die Eibohphobie, die Angst vor Palindromen, ist selbst ein Palindrom

Qui tacet, consentire videtur
ZITAT(KGB @ 17. Nov 2015, 12:54) *
Zitat Auto: "Brumm"
 
Nite
Beitrag 2. Sep 2007, 08:50 | Beitrag #55
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Generalmajor d.R.
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ZITAT
Wilcox aims to be third N.H. gun manufacturer

By Elizabeth Dinan, edinan@seacoastonline.com August 23, 2007 2:05 PM NEWINGTON — Jim Teetzel is finishing construction of an underground firing range, an assembly line and a 55,000-square foot addition to his Wilcox Industries plant, where within 30 days he’ll begin production as the state’s third gun manufacturer.

By then the assembly line will be manned by workers making .45 caliber Heckler & Koch (pronounced coke) handguns and rifles for U.S. military customers, primarily special forces. Newly teamed with the German gun maker, Teetzel’s company will engrave its firearms as made in New Hampshire, following the lead of Exeter’s Sigarms. A third firearms maker, Sturm Ruger & Co., also manufactures gun components in New Hampshire, from its Newport based steel investment foundry.

Teetzel expects to add 80 people to his 125-person payroll and to manufacture 40,000 .45 H&K pistols within the first year. One of the H&K rifles scheduled to come off his production line will feature real-time infrared images of targets seen and sighted around corners. He calls it the “smart weapon.”

“The potential is huge,” said Teetzel, a York, Maine resident, who moved his operations to 25 Piscataqua Road from the Pease Tradeport two years ago. “We don’t sell commercial product. It’s strictly for the defense of our county. And we don’t sell overseas.”

A mechanical engineer by trade, Teetzel named his company after his middle name and it now holds 18 patents and 30 patents pending. Wilcox military products range from breathing apparatus, life support systems and helmet mounts to gun scope mounts, lightweight air tanks and weapon video displays.

Everything is designed, manufactured and tested in his factory, which houses copy machines that produce 3D models and robotics performing non-stop job tasks.

A Q-Fog machine simulates salt fog for testing weapons in a simulated jungle environment and maritime operations. Another machine simulates temperature differences experienced by paratroopers falling through various atmospheric layers, to ensure rubber o-rings withstand the conditions.

“It’s easier said than done,” said Teetzel.

The company designs its own circuitry, writes its own code and builds its own models. Equipment for making plastic injection molds is expected to arrive Friday.

Because special forces is “not a large community,” the company is set up to support smaller orders, for instance 500 units of sniper scope supports, said Teetzel.

“We break down and set up all the time,” he said. “That’s a very important part of being competitive.”

The 125,000 square foot plant is segmented by design, manufacture, assembly, quality control and the newly added firing ranges. When range construction is complete, 25- and 100-meter lanes will be used to test fire newly made weapons, with empty casings mechanically collected into 55-gallon drums, then recycled. A parking lot will be paved over the top, “so you’ll never even know it’s there,” said Teetzel.

First rounds fired, with the targets they pierced, will be shipped to the military customers along with the arms.

“H&K is making a substantial investment,” he said while declining to specify the value of the partnership he described as “progressively growing.”

On a wall near the new firearms assembly line is the red H&K logo, with the company slogan, “no compromise.” The gun molds are on their way from Germany.

On the Wilcox side, one of the company’s products is a “mission helmet recording system camera,” a soldier-activated and helmet-mounted camera for recording incidents in the field from the wearer’s point of view. Up to eight hours of audio and video can be stored in a flash card housed in the back of the helmet and the video transmitted electronically.

Wilcox makes air tanks for the military that hold more pounds per square inch, while also weighing less. The Newington company has also designed and manufactured removable sights for rocket launchers, with tilt lasers to compensate for trajectory.

Letters of recognition line the walls of Teetzel’s plant for the company’s support of York school programs and his donations of dozens of wheelchairs to military hospitals. On Wednesday, the Governor’s Executive Council accepted his donation of three H&K UMP .45 caliber tactical weapons for use by N.H. State Police. Wilcox also recently donated those weapons to the Portsmouth and Newington police departments.

Quelle: Sea Coast Online




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Ceterum censeo asseculas Dais esse necandam.

#flapjackmafia #GuaranáAntarctica #arrr #PyramidHoneyTruther
 
Praetorian
Beitrag 10. Sep 2007, 19:27 | Beitrag #56
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Das Heer hat sich im Rahmen SFF Mehrrollenfähiges Leichtes Lenkflugkörpersystem/MELLS für Spike entschieden, damit ist die zumindest teilweise Nachfolge von MILAN wohl geklärt. Soweit ich die Meldung in der aktuellen SuT interpretiere, offenbar die Version -LR.
Integration in SPz Puma zeitgerecht bis Auslieferung der Serienfahrzeuge.


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This just in: Beverly Hills 90210 - Cleveland Browns 3
 
Dave76
Beitrag 25. Sep 2007, 21:32 | Beitrag #57
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"Staubtest" des M4 gegen HK416, XM8 und SCAR in den Dezember verschoben:
ZITAT
Army tests of rival carbines postponed

By Matthew Cox - Staff writer
Posted : Sunday Sep 23, 2007 9:51:33 EDT

The Army dust chamber tests designed to see how the M4 carbine performs against other carbines has been postponed until December, four months after its originally planned August start.

The upcoming tests will pit the M4 against the Heckler & Koch 416, the H&K XM8 and FNH USA's Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle, also known as SCAR.

The SCAR sample models, which are still in development, will not be delivered until December, Brig. Gen. Mark Brown, the commander of Program Executive Office Soldier, told Army Times recently. Brown said the tests will begin when all 10 sample models of each weapon are present. The test will feature weapons officials shooting 6,000 rounds though each weapon under sandstorm conditions.

Weapons officials from PEO Soldier scheduled the tests to be performed at Army Test and Evaluation Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., at the request of Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., in July. Coburn began questioning the Army more than four months ago about its plans to spend $375 million to purchase M4s through fiscal 2009. Lighter and more compact than the M16 rifle, the M4 is more effective for the close confines of urban combat. The Army began fielding the M4 in the mid-1990s.

Coburn questioned the M4's "long-standing reliability" problems in his original April 12 letter and asked if the Army had considered newer, possibly better weapons available on the commercial market.

Army weapons officials at Fort Benning's Infantry Center in Georgia — the command responsible for determining soldiers' weapons needs — maintain that the M4 carbine meets the Army's requirements and see no reason to replace it.

Brown said he received no complaints about the M4 carbine’s performance from soldiers during a recent trip to Iraq.

The contenders participating in the upcoming test use a piston-style operating system, which relies on a gas-driven piston rod to cycle the weapon during firing.

By contrast, the M4 uses a gas tube system, which relies on the gas created when a bullet is fired to cycle the weapon. Weapons experts said blowing gas directly into the receiver of the weapon spews carbon residue that can lead to fouling and heat that dries up lubrication and causes excessive wear on parts.

The Army's Delta Force replaced its M4s with the H&K 416 in 2004. The elite unit collaborated with the German arms maker to develop the new carbine. Experts said its piston operating system significantly reduces malfunctions while increasing the life of parts. Other special units, such as the Army's Asymmetric Warfare Group, also have used the 416.

U.S. Special Operations Command has also revised its small-arms requirements. In November 2004, SOCom awarded a developmental contract to FN Herstal to develop its new SCAR to replace its weapons from the M16 family.

And from 2002 to 2005, the Army developed the XM8 as a replacement for the conventional Army's M16 family. The program led to infighting in the service's weapons community and eventually died after failing to win approval at the Defense Department level.


http://www.armytimes.com/news/2007/09/army_rifletest_070920/


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"avenidas/avenidas y flores/flores/flores y mujeres/avenidas/avenidas y mujeres/avenidas y flores y mujeres y/un admirador" - Eugen Gomringer
"Two possibilities exist: either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying." - Arthur C. Clarke
Proud member of Versoffener Sauhaufen™!
#natoforum
 
Markus11
Beitrag 25. Sep 2007, 21:48 | Beitrag #58
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ZITAT(Glorfindel @ 24. Aug 2007, 18:33) [snapback]895922[/snapback]
Eigentlich nichts neues. Die Entscheidung die M24 durch die XM110 (aka SR-25) zu ersetzten ist schon zwei Jahre alt. Die Marines haben das SR-25 schon eingeführt. Grundsätzlich führen die "Squad Designated Marksmen" standardmässig das M24 wie auch daneben M16 oder M4 (airborne) mit ACOG-Optik. Anscheinend will man jedoch ein (halb-)automatisches Gewehr, weshalb auf Stufe Brigade oder Division zusätzlich noch die M14 eingeführt wurden. Dies ist auch der Grund weshalb diverse unterschiedliche M14-Modifikationen im Umlauf sind. Es ist auch zu bedenken, dass DSM eben keine Sniper sind. Ich denke das M14 ist gerade deshalb so beliebt, weil es eine halbautomatische Waffe ist. Die M24 gehören weiterhin zur Standardausrüstung der SDM. Das M14 wird jedoch im Kurs für angehende Squad Designated Marksmen ausgebildet, v.a. neben M16 und M4.

Daneben führen auch die Sniper Teams immer wieder gerne M14. Für diese ist es aber ohnehin leichter andere Waffen zu erhalten. Auch bei den Sniper wird das XM110 das M24 ablösen. Die National Guard ist z.T. noch mit M21 ausgerüstet, bei der Army wurde das M24 schon längere Zeit ausser Dienst gestellt.



Ist das m24 nicht viel präziser als das SR25? (Reptierer, weniger bewegbare Teile usw.?)
Oder überwiegt der Vorteil des schnelleren 2 Schusses dem Vorteil des genaueren Schusses so stark?

Mfg. Markus
 
Minfun
Beitrag 25. Sep 2007, 22:37 | Beitrag #59
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Random Asian Guy
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Die sogenannten "Squad Designated Marksmen" sollen auf vergleichsweise kleinerer Entfernung gezielte Feuerunterstützung geben, vorallem in einem hektischen Gefecht im urbanen Gelände überwiegt der Vorteil einer schnelleren Schussabgabe.


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E-A-K Clanmotto:
"[...]wir hätten das genauso gut in eine Niederlage verwandeln können."
 
Rapax
Beitrag 26. Sep 2007, 19:16 | Beitrag #60
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Da steht aber auch das Sniper, also die vollwertigen Scharfschützen, das SR-25 erhalten werden, wo die von dir genannten Argumente für SDM ja nun nicht mehr ansetzen.
 
 
 

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