eGun

Willkommen, Gast ( Anmelden | Registrierung )

Zurück zum Board Index
3 Seiten V   1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> neue Munition für das USMC, ausgelagert aus "Entwicklungen und News"
Panzermann
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 01:23 | Beitrag #1
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberstleutnant
Beiträge: 11.635



Gruppe: VIP
Mitglied seit: 19.11.2002


ZITAT
MARINE CORPS TIMES

February 15, 2010

The ‘barrier blind’ bullet--SOST rounds to replace M855 in Afghanistan

By Dan Lamothe

The Marine Corps is dropping its conventional 5.56mm ammunition in Afghanistan in favor of new deadlier, more accurate rifle rounds, and could field them at any time.

The open-tipped rounds until now have been available only to Special Operations Command troops. The first 200,000 5.56mm Special Operations Science and Technology rounds are already downrange with Marine Expeditionary Brigade–Afghanistan, said Brig. Gen. Michael Brogan, commander of Marine Corps Systems Command. Commonly known as “SOST” rounds, they were legally cleared for Marine use by the Pentagon in late-January, according to Navy Department documents obtained by Marine Corps Times.

SOCOM developed the new rounds for use with the Special Operations Force Combat Assault Rifle, or SCAR, which needed a more accurate bullet because its short barrel, which at 13.8 inches, is less than an inch shorter than the M4 carbine’s. Using an open-tip match round design common with some sniper ammunition, SOST rounds are designed to be “barrier blind,” meaning they stay on target better than existing M855 rounds after penetrating windshields, car doors and other objects.

Compared to the M855, SOST rounds also stay on target longer in open air and have increased stopping power through “consistent, rapid fragmentation which shortens the time required to cause incapacitation of enemy combatants,” according to Navy Department documents. At 62 grains, they weigh about the same as most NATO rounds, have a typical lead core with a solid copper shank and are considered a variation of Federal Cartridge Co.’s Federal Trophy Bonded Bear Claw round, which was developed for big-game hunting and is touted in a company news release for its ability to crush bone.

The Corps purchased a “couple million” SOST rounds as part of a joint $6 million, 10.4-million-round buy in September — enough to last the service several months in Afghanistan, Brogan said. Navy Department documents say the Pentagon will launch a competition worth up to $400 million this spring for more SOST ammunition. “This round was really intended to be used in a weapon with a shorter barrel, their SCAR car¬bines,” Brogan said. “But because of its blind-to-barrier performance, its accuracy improvements and its reduced muzzle flash, those are attractive things that make it also useful to general purpose forces like the Marine Corps and Army.”

M855 problems
The standard Marine round, the M855, was developed in the 1970s and approved as an official NATO round in 1980. In recent years, however, it has been the subject of widespread criticism from troops, who question whether it has enough punch to stop oncoming enemies.

In 2002, shortcomings in the M855’s performance were detailed in a report by Naval Surface War fare Center Crane, Ind., according to Navy Department documents. Additional testing showed shortcomings in 2005. The Pentagon issued a request to industry for improved ammunition the following year. Federal Cartridge was the only company to respond.

Brogan said the Corps has no plans to remove the M855 from the service’s inventory at this time. However, the service has determined it “does not meet USMC performance requirements” in an operational environment in which insurgents often lack personal body armor, but engage troops through “intermediate barriers” such as windshields and car doors at security check points, according to a Jan. 25 Navy Department document clearing Marines to use the SOST round.

The document, signed by J.R. Crisfield, director of the Navy Department International and Operational Law Division, is clear on the recommended course of action for the 5.56mm SOST round, formally known as MK318 MOD0 enhanced 5.56mm ammunition.

“Based on the significantly improved performance of the MK318 MOD0 over the M855 against virtually every anticipated target array in Afghanistan and similar combat environments where increased accuracy, better effects behind automobile glass and doors, consistent terminal performance and reduced muzzle flash are critical to mission accomplishment, USMC would treat the MK318 MOD0 as its new 5.56mm standard issue cartridge,” Crisfield wrote.

The original plan called for the SOST round to be used specifically within the M4 carbine, which has a 14½ -inch barrel and is used by tens of thousands of Marines in military occupational specialties such as motor vehicle operator where the M16A4’s longer barrel can be cumbersome. Given its benefits, however, Marine officials decided also to adopt SOST for the M16A4, which has a 20-inch bar rel and is used by most of the infantry.

Incorporating ‘SOST’
In addition to operational benefits, SOST rounds have similar ballistics to the M855 round, meaning Marines will not have to adjust to using the new ammo, even though it is more accurate.

“It does not require us to change our training,” Brogan said. “We don’t have to change our aim points or modify our training curriculum. We can train just as we have always trained with the 855 round, so right now, there is no plan to completely remove the 855 from inventory.”
Marine officials in Afghanistan could not be reached for comment, but Brogan said commanders with MEB-A are authorized to issue SOST ammo to any subordinate command. Only one major Marine 5.56mm weapon system down-range will not use SOST: the M249 squad automatic weapon. Though the new rounds fit the SAW, they are not currently produced in the linked fashion commonly employed with the light machine gun, Brogan said.

SOCOM first fielded the SOST round in April, said Air Force Maj. Wesley Ticer, a spokesman for the command. It also fielded a cousin — MK319 MOD0 enhanced 7.62mm SOST ammo — designed for use with the SCAR-Heavy, a powerful 7.62mm battle rifle. SOCOM uses both kinds of ammunition in all of its geographic combatant commands, Ticer said.

The Corps has no plans to buy 7.62mm SOST ammunition, but that could change if operational commanders or infantry requirements officers call for it in the future, Brogan said.

It is uncertain how long the Corps will field the SOST round. Marine officials said last summer that they took interest in it after the M855A1 lead-free slug in development by the Army experienced problems during testing, but Brogan said the service is still interested in the environmentally friendly round if it is effective. Marine officials also want to see if the price of the SOST round drops once in mass production. The price of an individual round was not available, but Brogan said SOST ammo is more expensive than current M855 rounds.

“We have to wait and see what happens with the Army’s 855LFS round,” he said. “We also have to get very good cost estimates of where these (SOST) rounds end up in full-rate, or serial production. Because if it truly is going to remain more expensive, then we would not want to buy that round for all of our training applications.”

Legal concerns
Before the SOST round could be fielded by the Corps, it had to clear a legal hurdle: Approval that it met international law of war standards.

The process is standard for new weapons and weapons systems, but it took on added significance because of the bullet’s design. Open-tip bullets have been approved for use by U.S. forces for decades, but are sometimes confused with hollow-point rounds, which expand in human tissue after impact, causing unnecessary suffering, according to widely accepted international treaties signed following the Hague peace conventions held in the Nether- lands in 1899 and 1907.

“We need to be very clear in drawing this distinction: This is not a hollow-point round, which is not permitted,” Brogan said. “It has been through law of land warfare review and has passed that review so that it meets the criteria of not causing unnecessary pain and suffering.”

The open-tip/hollow-point dilemma has been addressed several times by the military, including in 1990, when the chief of the Judge Advocate General International Law Branch, now-retired Marine Col. W. Hays Parks, advised that the open-tip M852 Sierra MatchKing round preferred by snipers met international law requirements. The round was kept in the field.

In a 3,000-word memorandum to Army Special Operations Command, Parks said “unnecessary suffering” and “superfluous injury” have not been formally defined, leaving the U.S. with a “balancing test” it must conduct to assess whether the usage of each kind of rifle round is justified.

“The test is not easily applied,” Parks said. “For this reason, the degree of ‘superfluous injury’ must ... outweigh substantially the military necessity for the weapon system or projectile.”

John Cerone, an expert in the law of armed conflict and professor at the New England School of Law, said the military’s interpretation of international law is widely accepted. It is understood that weapons cause pain in war, and as long as there is a strategic military reason for their employment, they typically meet international guidelines, he said.

“In order to fall within the prohibition, a weapon has to be designed to cause unnecessary suffering,” he said.

Sixteen years after Parks issued his memo, an Army unit in Iraq temporarily banned the open-tip M118 long-range used by snipers after a JAG officer mistook it for hollow-tip ammunition, according to a 2006 Washington Times report. The decision was over- turned when other Army officials were alerted.



--------------------
ZITAT(Hawkeye @ 28. Mar 2011, 04:37) *
Tipp des Tages:
.454 Casull Flachkopf-Massivgeschosse eignen sich hervorragend als Ohrenstöpsel!
 
Panzermann
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 01:38 | Beitrag #2
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberstleutnant
Beiträge: 11.635



Gruppe: VIP
Mitglied seit: 19.11.2002


Böses, böses Blei im Geschoß muß gehen.

ZITAT
Ammunition plant goes green
By Brian Burnes - The Kansas City Star
Posted : Friday Nov 7, 2008 6:24:29 EST

INDEPENDENCE, Mo. — On a recent day in Independence, a below-the-radar event occurred that figures to affect the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

An employee inside a huge government factory pushed a “buggy,” a low-riding wheelbarrow filled with thousands of new rifle cartridges, toward an inspection area.

Other employees and visitors crowded around.

The cartridges were made of brass casings assembled with propellant charges and projectiles, or slugs. The Lake City Army Ammunition Plant in Independence produces millions of such 5.56 mm cartridges every day for weapons that are carried by U.S. military forces.

But the employees attending this loading operation at Lake City knew these cartridges were different.

“This is the green ammunition,” said Bill Melton, a Lake City Army consultant.

These were cartridges without lead projectiles.

The recent manufacture of lead-free cartridges represented an evolutionary shift for Lake City, the largest producer of small-arms ammunition used by the U.S. military. The slugs, instead of being made of lead — a metal used for centuries — now are being manufactured with a bismuth alloy.

That alloy has a density roughly equivalent to lead but without lead’s toxicity.

The lead-free cartridges assembled in October were part of an initial 600,000-round test sample of green ammunition headed for the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland for evaluation.

This month, Lake City employees will begin producing the first order of 20 million rounds of lead-free cartridges.

The cartridges still will have to pass muster in ongoing evaluations, but they could be delivered by January to U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“What I try to tell the work force here is that they almost have an effect on global stability and the global economy,” said Lt. Col. Christopher Day, the U.S. Army’s plant commander at Lake City.

Ammunition manufacturers know lead to be malleable and comparatively inexpensive. But lead also is toxic.

“The military is looking to preserve its ability to train in the context of increasing environmental regulation,” Melton said. “The Army wanted to be able to continue live-fire training exercises without restriction.

“That’s the reason for going to a lead-free round.”

Within the ammunition-manufacturing universe, the conversion represents a vast retooling.

The ammunition produced at Lake City includes 5.56 mm cartridges used in the M-16 rifle, M-4 carbine and M-249 machine gun. The traditional lead-projectile cartridges still being manufactured at the approximately 4,000-acre complex represent the basic unit of foot-soldier combat.

Further, the plant’s defense role has grown in the last decade. Since the mid-1990s, production has rocketed from between 300 million and 400 million rounds a year to perhaps 1.4 billion.

“Every single soldier, sailor, airman or Marine who goes out of a combat outpost in Iraq or Afghanistan goes out with something that we make here,” Day said.

There’s also the effect on the local economy.

Lake City is the largest employer in Independence. Its work force, which numbers 2,550, has jumped almost 300 percent from 650 employees eight years ago.

“There have been times over the last five or six years when the spotlight was pretty hot on the plant to produce,” said Karen Davies, vice president and general manager at the government-owned facility, operated since 2000 by Alliant Techsystems.

Operators say the transition to green ammunition — combined with a seven-year, $240 million modernization — positions Lake City well for the long term.

The lead-free cartridges will display the same performance as cartridges with lead, Day said. In fact, the new M855 LFS is expected to include some improvements.

A suppressant will eliminate the muzzle flash that can give away the shooter’s position.

Quelle: http://www.armytimes.com/news/2008/11/ap_greenammo_110708/

Der Beitrag wurde von Panzermann bearbeitet: 13. Feb 2010, 01:39


--------------------
ZITAT(Hawkeye @ 28. Mar 2011, 04:37) *
Tipp des Tages:
.454 Casull Flachkopf-Massivgeschosse eignen sich hervorragend als Ohrenstöpsel!
 
Stormcrow
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 01:59 | Beitrag #3
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberleutnant
Beiträge: 1.848



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 09.01.2004


Naja, wenn man ein giftiges Massenprodukt mit einem gleichwertigen ungiftigen ersetzt, kann ich gut damit leben. Du nicht?


--------------------
Yea verily, though I charge through the valley of the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil, for I am driving a house-sized mass of FUCK YOU!"
 
SLAP
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 02:00 | Beitrag #4
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 2.740



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 13.08.2003


ZITAT(Panzermann @ 13. Feb 2010, 01:23) *
ZITAT
MARINE CORPS TIMES

February 15, 2010

The ‘barrier blind’ bullet--SOST rounds to replace M855 in Afghanistan
[...]




MK 318 MOD 0
62 grain [4g] OTM (reverse draw jacket) bullet
Temp stable flash reduced propellant
Not yaw dependant
Optimized for MK 16 (14” BBL)
2925 fps [891,54 m/s] @ 15’


MK 319 MOD 0
AB50, MK 319 MOD 0 (7.62MM Enhanced)
130 grain [8,4g] OTM (reverse drawn Jacket) Bullet
Temp stable flash reduced Propellant
Not yaw dependant
Reduced recoil (10%)
Optimized for MK 17 (16” BBL)
2925 fps [891,54 m/s] @ 15’
2750 fps [838,2 m/s] @ 15 (13” CQC BBL)


- Front of bullet is designed to help defeat barrier
- Back of bullet is solid copper and acts as a rear penetrator
- Short barrel propellant was specifically designed for this cartridge configuration
- Projectile can be manufactured on conventional bullet assembly machinery and it can be assembled on high speed loading equipment

Quelle: "U.S. Navy Small Arms Ammunition Advancements" Präsentation

Der Beitrag wurde von SLAP bearbeitet: 13. Feb 2010, 11:51


--------------------
"There are children on Promethea who can't afford ammo, you know."
 
Panzermann
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 02:15 | Beitrag #5
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberstleutnant
Beiträge: 11.635



Gruppe: VIP
Mitglied seit: 19.11.2002


Falls jemand bestellen will hier die Versorgungsnummern:

Mk318 Mod0 5.56mm barrier round w/62 grain reverse drawn jacketed bullet: NSN 1305-01-573-2229

Mk319 Mod0 7.62mm barrier round w/130 grain reverse drawn jacketed bullet: NSN 1305-01-572-8492

Mk316 Mod0 7.62mm special ball, long range w/175 grain Sierra Match King bullet with Gold Medal match primer: NSN 1305-01-567-6944

Mk248 Mod1 300 Win Mag Match w/ 220 grain Sierra Match King bullet: NSN 1305-01-568-7504



Trennung.

ZITAT(Stormcrow @ 13. Feb 2010, 01:59) *
Naja, wenn man ein giftiges Massenprodukt mit einem gleichwertigen ungiftigen ersetzt, kann ich gut damit leben. Du nicht?

Im Prinzip ja, aber...

Das Blei ist im Geschoß eingeschlossen. Da kommt nicht viel raus. Auch bei offenem Boden ist die Verbreitung in die Umwelt eher gering. Ein größeres Problem sind die Zündhütchen, und die werden weiterhin Blei enthalten und fein in die Gegend zerstäuben, weil bleifreie Zündladungen nicht so zuverlässig funktionieren bei unterschiedlichsten Umweltbedingungen (Kälte, Hitze).

Außer natürlich ein findiger Chemiker findet da was neues.

Der Beitrag wurde von Panzermann bearbeitet: 13. Feb 2010, 02:25


--------------------
ZITAT(Hawkeye @ 28. Mar 2011, 04:37) *
Tipp des Tages:
.454 Casull Flachkopf-Massivgeschosse eignen sich hervorragend als Ohrenstöpsel!
 
Kleiner
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 14:55 | Beitrag #6
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Feldwebel
Beiträge: 380



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 16.05.2006


Ähm was ist denn vorne in der Spitze? Auf dem Bild sieht das so aus, als wenn das Blei wäre und das ganze dann wirkt wie ein Deformationsgeschoss mata.gif , was ich mir jetzt nicht vorstellen kann.
 
SLAP
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 15:02 | Beitrag #7
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 2.740



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 13.08.2003


ZITAT(Kleiner @ 13. Feb 2010, 14:55) *
Ähm was ist denn vorne in der Spitze? Auf dem Bild sieht das so aus, als wenn das Blei wäre und das ganze dann wirkt wie ein Deformationsgeschoss mata.gif , was ich mir jetzt nicht vorstellen kann.


Laut eines Kommentars von Dr. Gary Roberts (US amerikanischer Wundballistiker) auf M4Carbine.net ist es Blei.

ZITAT
Not yaw dependant


Ein dezenter Hinweis, dass das Geschoss fragmentieren oder aufpilzen soll.


--------------------
"There are children on Promethea who can't afford ammo, you know."
 
da Busch
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 15:08 | Beitrag #8
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Leutnant
Beiträge: 760



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 29.05.2004


Sollte sich das bei "gepanzerten" Zielen nicht negativ auf die Zielwirkung auswirken? Ich bin was Munition angeht nicht sonderlich firm, meine nur mich erinnern zu können das die bisherigen Vollmantellgeschosse Panzerung effektiver penetrieren würden als Hohlspitzgeschosse, wobei bei letzteren die Mannstoppwirkung ja bekanntermaßen höher ist (die aber wohl eher unwichtig ist wenn das geschoss die Panzerung nicht penetriert).
Erleuchtet mich wink.gif


--------------------
All praise the mighty Nervenschock
 
SLAP
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 15:23 | Beitrag #9
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 2.740



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 13.08.2003


Häufig wird der Mantel abgestreift und nur der Kern kommt durch. Der alleine richtet natürlich weniger Schaden als das gesamte Geschoss.

Ob das hier der Fall ist kann ich nicht sagen.


--------------------
"There are children on Promethea who can't afford ammo, you know."
 
Kleiner
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 17:55 | Beitrag #10
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Feldwebel
Beiträge: 380



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 16.05.2006


Deformationsgeschossen sind doch indirekt über Genfer Konventionen verboten oder? Gibt da doch den Paragraphen mit unnötigen Leiden.
Zumal ja irgendwie ein Deformationsgeschoss ja auch nicht die Durschlagsleistung von 5,56 erhöht und die ist ja schon nicht gerade hoch.
 
Charos
Beitrag 13. Feb 2010, 21:22 | Beitrag #11
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Leutnant
Beiträge: 900



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 20.06.2004


Wenn man den Artikel gelesen hat kann man sich so manche Frage hier selbst beantworten..

Die Mk318 bietet gegenüber der seit den 70ern eingeführten M855 für Szenarien wie in AFG vorteile, da sie nach dem Durchschlage von z.B. Frontscheiben oder Autotüren weniger abgelenkt wird und eine größere Wirkung gegen ungepanzerte Ziele bietet. (Wir erinnern uns an die Ammenmärchen vom Dschihadisten der nach 5 Körpertreffern noch Säbel schwingend auf den Checkpoint zurennen konnte)
Die meisten "Insurgents" tragen keine Körperpanzerung, daher flutscht die M855 zu schnell durch ohne die nötige Mannstoppwirkung aufzuweisen - Da kommt jetzt die Mk318 ins Spiel, die diesen Nachteil zu kompensieren versucht. Das geht dann aber vermutlich auf Kosten der Penetrationswirkung gegen Körperpanzerungen - Was aber wieder wurscht ist da man eher auf ungepanzerte Gegner schiesst.
Auserdem ist die Mk318 für die mittlerweile kürzeren Lauflängen besser geeignet als die M855

Der Schnitt schaut zwar schon nach Hollow-Point also Hohlspitz aus, ist es aber laut de Herrn Brogan keins, sondern Ein "open-tip"- Geschoss. Ob das jetzt nur eine juristische Spitzfindigkeit ist um die rechtlichen Probleme mit Hollow-point - Geschossen zu umgehen vermag ich nicht zu sagen, der Effekt dürfte aber ähnlich sein, viell aufgrund fehlender Perforation beim Mantel der Mk318 weniger stark ausgeprägt. Das ist jetzt aber Spekulation da man nix genaues nicht weiss.

Penetration von Körperpanzerung und Mannstoppwirkung ist immer eine Gradwanderung, das dürfte auch der Grund sein wieso die M855 nicht ausgemustert wird, so kann man dann je nach zu erwartender Gegnerqualität die passende Munition aussuchen, in Konflikten bei denen mit vermehrtem Auftreten von "gehärteten" Gegner zu rechnen ist wird M855 geladen, wenns gegen weiche Taliban geht dann läd man eben Mk318

Der Beitrag wurde von Charos bearbeitet: 13. Feb 2010, 21:25


--------------------
Ready your breakfast and eat hearty.. for tonight we dine in Hell!
 
Nite
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 01:39 | Beitrag #12
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Generalmajor d.R.
Beiträge: 15.023



Gruppe: Moderator
Mitglied seit: 05.06.2002


ZITAT(Kleiner @ 13. Feb 2010, 17:55) *
Deformationsgeschossen sind doch indirekt über Genfer Konventionen Haager Landkriegsordnung verboten oder?

Die Genfer Konvention befasst sich lediglich mit dem Schutz von Verwundeten, Kriegsgefangenen und Zivilisten sowie der Definition von Schutzzeichen.


--------------------
Cry 'havoc', and let slip the dogs of war!
Thou canst not kill that which doth not live. But you can blast it into chunky kibbles!


Arrrrr!
 
maschinenmensch
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 13:22 | Beitrag #13
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Leutnant
Beiträge: 722



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 19.03.2004


Antwort von Dr. Gary Roberts auf die Frage, wie denn das SOST/TOTM Projektil genau funzt:

ZITAT
No, the article does not reveal a lot of hard data. I can assure you that the SOST/TOTM rounds are definitely more effective than current options.

If I were currently going into OCONUS military combat armed with a 5.56 mm carbine, I'd want to be running the Mk318 ammo.


Kann man sich ja ausmalen dass es aufpilzen muss....
 
Opa Paul
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 14:10 | Beitrag #14
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Fähnrich
Beiträge: 194



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 11.03.2002


ZITAT(Panzermann @ 13. Feb 2010, 02:15) *
Im Prinzip ja, aber...

Das Blei ist im Geschoß eingeschlossen. Da kommt nicht viel raus.


unsinn. die geschosse zerplatzen oft genug.


ZITAT
Auch bei offenem Boden ist die Verbreitung in die Umwelt eher gering.


so gering das sich ausbilder bei der bundeswehr mit blei vergifteten und daraufhin schadstoffarme munition eingeführt wurde.


ZITAT
Ein größeres Problem sind die Zündhütchen, und die werden weiterhin Blei enthalten und fein in die Gegend zerstäuben, weil bleifreie Zündladungen nicht so zuverlässig funktionieren bei unterschiedlichsten Umweltbedingungen (Kälte, Hitze).

Außer natürlich ein findiger Chemiker findet da was neues.


funktioniert schon, ist für die massenfertigung noch zu teuer.

jedes gramm das man einsparen kann, sollte man einsparen.
 
Reservist
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 14:40 | Beitrag #15
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 3.081



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 20.09.2005


ZITAT(Opa Paul @ 14. Feb 2010, 14:10) *
so gering das sich ausbilder bei der bundeswehr mit blei vergifteten und daraufhin schadstoffarme munition eingeführt wurde.


Quelle? Das ist nämlich dann großes Kunststück.


--------------------
Mein Blog- Der Kamener

Mein Spritverbrauch:
 
SoldierofFortune
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 17:53 | Beitrag #16
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberleutnant
Beiträge: 1.546



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 09.09.2003


Naja, sooo problematisch ist blei nu nicht, wie es in den letzten 5 bis 10 Jahren verteufelt wird.

Egal, irgendwie sieht das Mk 318 den GROM von Priv Partizan ähnlich. Letzteres ist eigentlich für den jagdlichen Gebrauch. Ich selbst hab damit noch keine Erfahrungen gemacht aber ein paar Bekannte waren davon eher entäuscht. Wurde da das Rad etwa wieder neu erfunden? confused.gif

Der Beitrag wurde von SoldierofFortune bearbeitet: 14. Feb 2010, 17:55


--------------------
Über 15000 Jahre Kriegsgeschichte und Waffenentwicklung und wir schießen immer noch mit Pfeilen!!

Gibt es in einer Teefabrik eine Kaffee-Pause??
 
SLAP
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:01 | Beitrag #17
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 2.740



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 13.08.2003


Was für ein Vergleich...


--------------------
"There are children on Promethea who can't afford ammo, you know."
 
SoldierofFortune
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:04 | Beitrag #18
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberleutnant
Beiträge: 1.546



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 09.09.2003


Was passt dir daran nicht?


--------------------
Über 15000 Jahre Kriegsgeschichte und Waffenentwicklung und wir schießen immer noch mit Pfeilen!!

Gibt es in einer Teefabrik eine Kaffee-Pause??
 
SLAP
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:08 | Beitrag #19
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 2.740



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 13.08.2003


"sieht irgendwie ähnlich "



--------------------
"There are children on Promethea who can't afford ammo, you know."
 
SoldierofFortune
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:11 | Beitrag #20
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberleutnant
Beiträge: 1.546



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 09.09.2003


Wenn es nu so ist, ist es so. Mit Ausnahme, dass die Grom schwerer sind und der Bleikern rauragt, ist der Aufbau gleich. Die Unterschiede sind nur marginal. Zum töten sind beide geschaffen.


--------------------
Über 15000 Jahre Kriegsgeschichte und Waffenentwicklung und wir schießen immer noch mit Pfeilen!!

Gibt es in einer Teefabrik eine Kaffee-Pause??
 
SLAP
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:16 | Beitrag #21
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 2.740



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 13.08.2003


Minimale Unterschiede im Geschossaufbau, die verwendeten Materialien und deren Verarbeitung machen einen großen Unterschied.



ZITAT
The West German 7.62 round used copper-plated steel in the jacket, but their US counterparts used gilding metal alloy around .032 inches (.8mm) thick at the cannelure. The West German jacket is only about .020 inches (.5mm) thick near the cannelure. As a result of the differences, particularly the weaker jacket, the West German round yaws after 8cm or so in tissue before breaking in half at the cannelure. The nose, comprising just over half of the bullet's weight, generally remains intact, and the remaining mass of the lower half fragments. The result in tissue is predictably devastating.


--------------------
"There are children on Promethea who can't afford ammo, you know."
 
SoldierofFortune
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:35 | Beitrag #22
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberleutnant
Beiträge: 1.546



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 09.09.2003


Das sieht aber eher nach den älteren Geschossen aus. Die Rede ist ja vom Mk318


--------------------
Über 15000 Jahre Kriegsgeschichte und Waffenentwicklung und wir schießen immer noch mit Pfeilen!!

Gibt es in einer Teefabrik eine Kaffee-Pause??
 
Hummingbird
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:43 | Beitrag #23
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberstleutnant
Beiträge: 11.634



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 03.12.2004


ZITAT
MARINE CORPS TIMES
[...]
Sixteen years after Parks issued his memo, an Army unit in Iraq temporarily banned the open-tip M118 long-range used by snipers after a JAG officer mistook it for hollow-tip ammunition, according to a 2006 Washington Times report. The decision was over- turned when other Army officials were alerted.
Ich verstehe nicht warum das M118 hier als "open tip" klassifiziert wird. Das ist doch ein BTHP.
 
SoldierofFortune
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:46 | Beitrag #24
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberleutnant
Beiträge: 1.546



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 09.09.2003


..HP bedeutet ja Hollow Point. Open Tip beutet offene Spitze. Somit ist beides vergleichbar


--------------------
Über 15000 Jahre Kriegsgeschichte und Waffenentwicklung und wir schießen immer noch mit Pfeilen!!

Gibt es in einer Teefabrik eine Kaffee-Pause??
 
Praetorian
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:49 | Beitrag #25
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Konteradmiral
Beiträge: 17.140



Gruppe: Globalmod.WHQ
Mitglied seit: 06.08.2002


ZITAT(SoldierofFortune @ 14. Feb 2010, 18:35) *
Das sieht aber eher nach den älteren Geschossen aus. Die Rede ist ja vom Mk318

Das ist klar. Du verstehst nur nicht, worauf SLAP hinaus will bzw. du musst dir auch mal durchlesen, was andere schreiben.
Das, was da abgebildet ist, ist das Ergebnis eines um nur 0,3 mm dünneren Geschossmantels. "Sieht ähnlich aus" ist kein sinnvolles Vergleichswerkzeug.


--------------------
This just in: Beverly Hills 90210 - Cleveland Browns 3
 
Hummingbird
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:50 | Beitrag #26
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberstleutnant
Beiträge: 11.634



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 03.12.2004


ZITAT(SoldierofFortune @ 14. Feb 2010, 18:46) *
..HP bedeutet ja Hollow Point. Open Tip beutet offene Spitze. Somit ist beides vergleichbar


Im Effekt ja, aber um den kleinen Unterschied geht es doch gerade im Artikel.

ZITAT
after a JAG officer mistook it for hollow-tip


Edit: Bezugspost eingefügt.

Der Beitrag wurde von Hummingbird bearbeitet: 14. Feb 2010, 18:51
 
SoldierofFortune
Beitrag 14. Feb 2010, 18:58 | Beitrag #27
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberleutnant
Beiträge: 1.546



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 09.09.2003


ZITAT(Praetorian @ 14. Feb 2010, 18:49) *
ZITAT(SoldierofFortune @ 14. Feb 2010, 18:35) *
Das sieht aber eher nach den älteren Geschossen aus. Die Rede ist ja vom Mk318

Das ist klar. Du verstehst nur nicht, worauf SLAP hinaus will bzw. du musst dir auch mal durchlesen, was andere schreiben.
Das, was da abgebildet ist, ist das Ergebnis eines um nur 0,3 mm dünneren Geschossmantels. "Sieht ähnlich aus" ist kein sinnvolles Vergleichswerkzeug.

Gut, da hab ich wirklich nicht richtig gelesen aber dahingehend ist es wie ein hartes und weiches Teilmantelgeschoss. Im Prinzip sind sie gleich aber eben nicht zielbalistisch gleich geeignet. Da muss man die Geschwindigkeit des Projektils beachten. Grundsätzlich sind die Geschosse nun aber gleich. Anders sieht es aus, wenn ein deformierender Mantel mit einem harten, schweren, nicht deformierenden und sich nicht vom Mantel lösendem Kern verbunden würde.
Ob das Geschoss (Mk318 vs Grom) nun splittert, formstabil bleibt oder nur aufpilzt, ist meiner Meinung nach nun nicht so ein großer Unterschied. Natürlich ergeben sich da andere Wunden und Wirkungen aber dahingehend muss man auch die Entfernung betrachten, auf die Getroffen wurde.


--------------------
Über 15000 Jahre Kriegsgeschichte und Waffenentwicklung und wir schießen immer noch mit Pfeilen!!

Gibt es in einer Teefabrik eine Kaffee-Pause??
 
Panzermann
Beitrag 15. Feb 2010, 11:08 | Beitrag #28
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Oberstleutnant
Beiträge: 11.635



Gruppe: VIP
Mitglied seit: 19.11.2002


@Glückssoldat: doch das ist ein ganz erheblicher Unterschied, ob ein Geschoß sich zerlegt oder nicht. die deutsche Mun mit ihrem dünnen Mantel hat eine erheblich bösere Wundwirkung als das im Prinzip "durch flutschende" US Projektil. Der Mantel ist nur so dünn um Kosten zu sparen. Die Zerlegung ist reiner Zufall und unbeabsichtigt. Wäre ja ansonsten durch die schon erwähnte Landkriegsordnung verboten.

Trennung.

ZITAT(Reservist @ 14. Feb 2010, 14:40) *
ZITAT(Opa Paul @ 14. Feb 2010, 14:10) *
so gering das sich ausbilder bei der bundeswehr mit blei vergifteten und daraufhin schadstoffarme munition eingeführt wurde.


Quelle? Das ist nämlich dann großes Kunststück.

Das Frage Ich mich auch, wie sich Bundeswehrausbilder eine Bleivergiftung zuziehen durch die Geschosse. Bei bleihaltigen Zündhütchen, klar: das Blei wird fein verteilt aus der Laufmündung gepustet. Deswegen nach dem Schießen die Uniform in die wäsche geben, schön die Pfoten und das Gesicht waschen, damit man nicht den gifitgen staub mit der Nahrung aufnimmt. Genaugenommen müsste man auch den Schnuffi tragen um die Lunge zu schützen, aber das will ja niemand. Dieses Problem ist natürlich auf geschlossenen Ständen noch um vieles größer. Die gemeine Bundeswehr StOSchAnl ist ja doch eher eine Freiluftveranstaltung, da sollte der Staub doch größtenteils vom Winde verweht werden.


Etwas über Blei vergiftete Bundeswehrsoldaten wüsst Ich jetzt auch gern was. Vielleicht ist das Problem doch größer als Ich dachte. mata.gif



Der Tombakmantel ist übrigens auch gifitg...

Der Beitrag wurde von Panzermann bearbeitet: 15. Feb 2010, 11:39


--------------------
ZITAT(Hawkeye @ 28. Mar 2011, 04:37) *
Tipp des Tages:
.454 Casull Flachkopf-Massivgeschosse eignen sich hervorragend als Ohrenstöpsel!
 
Reservist
Beitrag 16. Feb 2010, 17:39 | Beitrag #29
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 3.081



Gruppe: Members
Mitglied seit: 20.09.2005


ZITAT(SoldierofFortune @ 14. Feb 2010, 17:53) *
Naja, sooo problematisch ist blei nu nicht, wie es in den letzten 5 bis 10 Jahren verteufelt wird.


Grundsätzlich ist Blei schon problematisch.
Die Exposition beim Schießen -gerade bei Freiluftständen- kann man allerdings als nicht vorhanden bezeichnen.

Anders sieht es z. B. beim Fegen von geschlossenen Ständen aus.
Hier empfiehlt sich das Tragen einer spez. Schutzmaske gegen Bleidämpfe (gitbs bei Praktiker für 7,49 Eur).
Allerdings ist hier das Fegen eh immer relativ kritisch zu betrachten, da das Zeug (nicht das Blei, sondern der Rest) eigentlich leichtenzündlich ist. Hier müsste man nass wischen.

Der Beitrag wurde von Reservist bearbeitet: 16. Feb 2010, 17:39


--------------------
Mein Blog- Der Kamener

Mein Spritverbrauch:
 
SLAP
Beitrag 16. Feb 2010, 20:31 | Beitrag #30
+Quote PostProfile CardPM
Hauptmann
Beiträge: 2.740



Gruppe: WHQ
Mitglied seit: 13.08.2003


Im SINTOX Zündhütchen von RUAG wurde das Bleitrizinat durch Diazodinitrophenol ersetzt. Bedenkenloser Umgang ist trotzdem nicht empfohlen, weil immernoch Schwermetalle enthalten sind. Schadstoffarm ist nicht schadstofffrei.

Der Beitrag wurde von SLAP bearbeitet: 16. Feb 2010, 20:33


--------------------
"There are children on Promethea who can't afford ammo, you know."
 
 
 

3 Seiten V   1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic


1 Besucher lesen dieses Thema (Gäste: 1 | Anonyme Besucher: 0)
0 Mitglieder:




Vereinfachte Darstellung Aktuelles Datum: 1. October 2014 - 04:59